Author Topic: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre  (Read 253047 times)

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Offline Marky

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Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« on: July 03, 2002, 03:20:19 pm »
Does anyone know if there is a cable supplier in Brookmans Park ?
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2002, 04:54:59 pm »
Unfortunately there is not a cable TV supplier, my enquiries indicate that neither NTL or Telewest have any immediate plans to cable up BP.

However, if its fast internet access you're after then ADSL is available from BT. My postcode (Peplins Way) is indicated as being available, check on the bt.com website to make sure. You will need to have an existing BT phone line and the line will also need to be tested to see if it is suitable for ADSL.

My advice, however is not to buy ADSL from BT but a third party (who still use the BT line) such as Demon. This is often cheaper than the BT product and you get a better choice of modem.

Many people want to be able to share their internet connection amongst several PCs and the best (although not only) method is to use a router, these are available for about 90.00 and generally use an ethernet connection. The BT broadband product uses USB which is much less flexible.

I have used ADSL on quite a few occasions (I support a network as part of my job) for homeworking and have found BT to be excellent, despite what many people say.

I'd be happy to offer any further advice to anyone who wants to message me.

SQ
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2002, 04:59:12 pm »
You are right SQ, ADSL is available locally. †You have to check with BT to see if it reaches your road (something to do with the distance from the Potters Bar exchange) but I have it and it is excellent. †If you are using it for your business, consider having a new line put in for the ADSL or converting your business line. The same number serves for both your business phone and your online connection and you can receive and make calls while online.  As I write my line rate in Kbps is 576.000 for receiving and 288.000 for sending.  So does that work out about 10 times faster than an ordinary modem?  Not sure but it is really fast.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2002, 05:03:09 pm by admin »
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Offline Marky

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2002, 05:47:12 pm »
Looks like ASDL it is then. Do I have to use a router to share PC's will a hub not do the job.
Thanks for the replies they have been of great help.
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2002, 06:46:19 pm »
Marky

A hub is not the same as a router and will not achieve what you need to share your internet connection.

On a network running TCP/IP (the protocol that the internet and many other networks use) every device on the network needs a unique address. This is a 32 bit number normally split into four numbers, eg 217.33.40.74

Your modem supplied by BT or whoever will generally only have ONE address available. In the case of a single computer this address is used.

However, if you have more than one computer you will need to share this address. This is the job of the router. This takes the connection (and single address) of the ADSL modem and translates it to a 'private' range of IP addresses. This is called NAT (network address translation)

Without wanting to get too technical (although I will if you like  ;D) there are special 'reserved' ranges of IP addresses that are used for private networks, in many cases this is 192.168.x.x

Generally the router will have 4 or more ports on the 'LAN' side of the router (you can increase this with another hub if required) which your computers connect to. The router will automatically allocate IP addresses to your computers in this 'private' range. Connections to the internet then get translated by the router to the 'real' address - the result is that to the ADSL modem it just looks like there is one computer running lots of sessions at once.

Another benefit of using a router (and I recommend people use a router even if they don't share the connection) is much increased security. Although not foolproof they act as a rudimentary firewall as in general they only allow connections from the 'inside' (LAN) out. Also it is possible to 'hide' the router from the outside world by disabling ping responses, this will deter the majority of script kiddies from trying to hack your computer. You should ideally also run a decent, up-to-date anti-virus product and a software firewall such as ZoneAlarm for maximum protection.

Hope that explains a bit further, I'm happy to advise further.

BTW, my recommended product is the SMC Barricade 7004ABR - I have bought 4 or 5 of these and have been no trouble.

SQ
 

Offline Marky

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2002, 08:05:32 pm »
Does the router come pre-configured with an IP range or would I need to configure it myself ?
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2002, 08:24:11 pm »
Marky

Generally yes, the default setup for the Barricade router will work 'out-of-the-box'. As long as the computers connected are configured to obtain an IP address automatically (probably are anyway) it should work. This is probably true for other makes of router.

I'm normally available to solve any problems for the odd pint... ;)
 

Offline Marky

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2002, 08:27:30 pm »
sasquartch

I will keep that in mind. Thanks for your help.
 

John_fraser

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2002, 10:52:21 pm »
Iíve been looking at ADSL providers. The following link gives an extensive list of providers with links to their sites:

http://www.ispreview.co.uk/broadband/xdsl.shtml

Who you chose depends on what you want e.g. several offer fix IP addresses and prices vary. Iíve asked around for peoples experiences and every supplier has horror stories as well as people who say that it couldnít be easier. BT seems to have the biggest share of complaints, but it is the biggest supplier so that might be expected.

Even if you donít have broadband get a firewallll. Iím on dial up and my firewall blocks several attempts to access my computer every night. A Firewall is as important as a virus scanner. Even a cheep software FW like Black Ice will offer vastly more protection than the majority of internet users have

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00004WKK0/026-1101951-9186814
 

Offline MC

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2002, 02:19:42 am »
I hadn't noticed this thread. Interesting. I have a question and an observation.

The observation is that I use Zonealarm which is a free firewall application; it's always had good reviews and seems to work fine.

The question is a bit more tricky. I had been (very loosely) contemplating broadband and sharing it between PCs. Right now I have a very small (2 PC !) network that exists using Firewire. Which is great because I have an easy to use 400Mbps LAN.

Anyway there is an ISDN line on the desktop and a laptop is connected to the desktop via the Firewire network. Prior to it all falling over after a major problem with the desktop (...and now it's subsequent rebuild....) I was able to share the ISDN connection between both machines using the capability inherent in W98SE.

So my question is would I or would I not be able to have a broadband connection to the desktop in future and then share that between both the desktop and the laptop????

Thanks

MC
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2002, 12:31:25 pm »
MC

You should be able to share an internet connection using ICS in Win98 whether its using dial up or through another adapter, ISDN or otherwise. I've no experience of firewire but in principle you shouldn't have a problem.

A router is still the best option for sharing because
a) you don't need both PCs on all the time
b) NAT provides good security against hacking (in conjunction with a software firewall of course)
c) The barricade router I recommend features a print server to allow printing from any PC on your network
d) inherently more reliable - never known one crash yet !

The downside is of course the cost at around £90 inc VAT and you need network cards in each PC (very cheap these days though)

Hope this helps, if you still have problems feel free to message me.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2002, 01:54:23 pm by sasquartch »
 

Offline MC

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #11 on: July 04, 2002, 01:38:10 pm »
Sasquartch - thanks for the info. I didn't know that ICS limited sharing to only one extra computer; I doubt it would be a problem in my case but it depends how things work out.

MC
 

Offline Govvy

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2002, 08:29:03 pm »
Just to let you know, Brookmans Park has been upgraded and everyone should be able to get BroadBand.

If you noticed all the BT staff around Brookmans Park. They have been updating the elements and wire checking for most of Brookmans Park. Making it compatable to access the Broadband.

On a downside they now can listen in to all your home conversations! just a joke!
 

Offline CarolineB

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2002, 02:56:54 pm »
I also have a question, and apologies if it is too basic. We have 3 computers in different rooms in our house with 2 phone lines and use AOL unlimited access for £15.99 per month (useful, since we are on-line a lot). I am very interested in broadband since our present connection speed is abysmally slow due to BT giving us a split line for the 2 phone lines (apparently unavoidable since we are at the end of their line system in Pine Grove). I would be happy to use AOL Broadband, but at present they say this is for only one computer. Can I use a router dor this, enabling all 3 computers to use this? And if so, does a router require cabling networking between the computers?

Caroline
Caroline
 

Offline MC

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2002, 04:08:33 pm »
As far as I know you ought to be able to set-up a network between your PCs and then use "something" as the point of connection to the outside world.

That something would either be a router or could be one of the PCs - there is a feature called internet connection sharing (ICS). From what I know and I think previous posts on this thread it should be possible to have one of the PCs as a master PC with the broadband connection and then use ICS so that the others can access the internet via this master PC.

My solution is to use Firewire connections - these provide a very fast network between the PCs. Firewire is also the means used to connect a Digital Video camera to a PC so there's a spin-off benefit there too. I have tried ICS between PCs and successfully accessed the internet indirectly. It is also possible to share printers etc.

That said you would need the master PC on for the other PCs to access the internet - this is the primary benefit of the router approach. Although of course then you need the router on all the time  ;D

I like the Firewire solution because I happened to have Firewire ports on the soundcard I have so it was essentially free in terms of hardware. I needed software of course but that's not too expensive. It's really easy to set-up and the network runs at 400Mb/s compared to Ethernet/router at 100Mb/s.

Importantly, having said all that, I've only got ISDB and not broadband so the ultimate test hasn't been made. Previous posts by others suggest ICS with broadband should work though.

Happy to talk this through if that would help

Mark
 

Offline CarolineB

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2002, 08:05:31 pm »
Mark,

Thanks for your reply. I am not going to do it just yet but will consider it for the near future. Really appreciate your offer to talk me through it and would be delighted to take you up on this at a later date.

Caroline
Caroline
 

John_fraser

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2002, 11:49:08 am »
If you don't have Firewire (AKA IEEE 1394) you could use your USB ports. Bandwidth is not as good, but probably good enough for a home network:

http://www.usbgear.com/usa/item_35.html

Or Wireless:

http://www.linksys.com/Products/product.asp?grid=22&prid=435

I've only one PC, so the last SoHo network I setup was with Windows 3.11. Anyone tried this?
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2002, 12:46:57 am »
Bandwidth is not an issue on a home network for internet sharing as ADSL provides at best 512kbits ie half a meg. So it doesn't matter whether you're using USB (I think about 5Mbits in theory max) Ethernet (10Mbits) Fast Ethernet (100Mbits) or Firewire (400Mbits).

The most reliable method by far in my experience is ethernet, you need a card in each PC admittedly but these can be bought for £15 or less even from high street stores like PC World. less from mail order places like Watford Electronics. The cables between the PCs and the router or hub can be up to 100 metres long (and are cheap), so unlike USB, cable length will never be a problem for a home network. FireWire whilst a great solution isn't as  cheap, although if you have other peripherals like video cameras it may be right for you.

Ethernet is a very mature technology, being around for 20 years, so is cheap and reliable. So I think its probably best for the average user.

I'd be pleased to offer advice on this, I've set up many home workers this way. Also, for ADSL I'd recommend Demon Internet, slighter cheaper than BT OpenWorld and with a better choice of modem. (The BT product is USB only)

 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2002, 12:37:28 am »
Finally got onto ADSL and I thought Iíd share my experiences in case anyone was thinking about changing to broadband:

Installation
I ordered ADSL last Friday. The ADSL modem and micro-filters were sent by the ISP last Tuesday and the line was activated today.

The actual installation couldnít have been much easier. Although I donít know if this would be true if I wasn't using Windows XP Ė I really love the way hardware installations are handled under XP. They actually work.

First I pluged the micro filters into the phone socket that will have a phone on it. This took seconds, as its just a small box Ė about 1cm by 2cm by .5cm Ė that sits between the phone and socket. If I had wanted to use a phone and the computer on the same socket, the micro filter has two connections, so no problem.

Then I pluged the ADSL modem into the micro-filter and into a USB port on my PC. When the ďnew hardware wizardĒ popped up I told  it to look for the drivers on the CD supplied with the modem.

Took about a minute. Then it will asked for my username and password. These had already been  supplied by the ISP a few days earlier.

Thatís it! Less than five minutes work and no issues.

Speed
On paper its supposed to be 10 times the download speed. My reaction was WOW! Does it fly or what! I work for an exceeding large company which has a 20Mb pipe, but this seemed almost as fast Ė although that pipe is shared across 17,000 employees. Iíve just downloaded a 39Meg trailer for The Two Towers while listening to Radio 4.

You also donít have to dial up to get a connection. Boot up and youíre on the internet. So maybe now I can do as many posts as Jet :)

Cost
Would you believe its cheaper? I use to have two phone lines so as not to tie up the phone, plus I paid the ISP for unlimited access. Well with ADSL you can use the phone at the same time and it's always unlimited access. So I had a line removed, which more than covered the additional cost.

The ISP
I used Zen www.zen.co.uk and after one nightís experience I can recommend them. Contracts are for a month, you get 50Mb of web space, a mail account and a fixed IP address.

I recommend you visit ISP Review to see what other ISPs offer
http://www.ispreview.co.uk/broadband/xdsl.shtml

So in summary, I fully recommend the switch.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2002, 12:43:39 am by John_fraser »
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2002, 12:11:52 pm »
John

Good to hear that you're happy with ADSL.

Only thing I would point out is that if you want to share your broadband connection between multiple PCs it is easier to do this with an ethernet cable modem. The downside is that you need a network card in your PC rather than USB (which you will already have anyway)
Then, using a router (which also acts as a firewall) you can connect multiple computers.

So, if anybody considering broadband thinks they want to do this, make sure the ISP can provide a ethernet modem rather than a USB type. I know that BT do NOT offer this option although others do, such as Demon Internet.



 

Offline Largey

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2002, 12:21:20 pm »
Just a small observation. BT offer a "Wires Only" ADSL connection. This allows you to put anything you like on the end. Either a USB modem or Router. But of course you have to pay for the equipment which vary according to brand.

Regards
 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2002, 11:38:40 pm »
Well I'm dead jealous. One of the reasons for wanting broadband at home is so that I don't have to go grovelling to the chap at work (who has cable from NTL) to download trailers, movies, etc.

The one thing you didn't say John was how much Zen are charging you.

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John_fraser

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2002, 12:04:08 am »
£59 connection
£82 modem and filters
£30 per month including VAT

All about par, but looking at ISP Review does help you compare prices. You can get cheaper.

A friend got "wires only" from BT and that is about £27per month including VAT

I use to pay £16 per month for BT plus £9 line rental. Which, after doing my sums with VAT included, means that I pay an extra £5 for 10-12 times the performance.

I'm now busy trying to get Fiona to let me setup a wireless LAN :). Only condition seems to be that I have to decorate the hall first :(
 

Offline MC

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2002, 12:46:05 pm »
try gio internet. They're £18 per month
 

Offline MC

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2002, 02:44:27 pm »
actually don't. I found out that there seem to be a lot of people with credit card charges for services they never got. Puls it's allied to yet claims to be seaprate from another ADSL provider that went bust.

However I think Eclipse may be a much better proposition.  Nearly 15% cheaper and only require a one month notice period rather than the bigger providers who demand 12 month contracts
 

Offline NMLHS

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2003, 01:40:04 am »
Like John I can recommend ADSL.  However I did have to get BT to check the line and get the connection working.  I have three extensions to the line plus one of the cheap number for long distance  and international calls gadgets.  This I discovered is too much for the modem to cope with.  The connection only works if I disconnect the cheap number gadget  and the third extension.  Having done that and fitted a stronger radio suppressor to 'clean up' the line, it works like a charm.
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2003, 10:24:09 am »
We have linked both our PC and my laptop with a crossover patch cable so that the ADSL connection can be shared. Before, I was always being nagged by the children who wanted to use the connection  for browsing online for their homework. Now we can have two machines online for the same cost as one. You have to have two network cards to do this of course.  Another advantage is that you can have 'shared folders' on the main PC to store material everyone wants to access.
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Offline shads

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2003, 05:01:53 pm »
 ???I'm glad everyone else seems to have a relatively easy instalment.
I purchased mine thru aol and could not get it to work at all.After numerous calls to Aol and being told to buy better cables then being told to contact BT who then informed me it was aol's problem not theirs,i finally lost the plot and had an extremely heated argument with both aol and BT.The next day a BT engineer turned up and fixed the problem within 2 minutes.This was 2 months after first receiving the kit.
The problem stemmed from the radio filters in the bt boxes which were not only cutting out the radio signals from the BBC transmitter but also the ADSL signals.
What annoyed me the most was all the time i spent on various helplines trying to get this working whilst all the time the problem was one i could not fix myself.
I really think that if aol/bt could cross reference the ADSL order with your postcode and realise that these addresses have radio filters fitted you could avoid months of hassle.
Thats the moan over with and as for the adsl ....now it finally works i think it is superb
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2003, 03:47:04 am »
BT should have ADSL installation in BP down pat by now.  Mine was installed two years ago and the standard 4-port ADSL router was plagued by RF interference from the BP transmitter.  The standard BT phone RF suppressor does not clean the line correctly for this set up, another kind is needed.  Strangely the single port USB hub they use for testing worked without extra suppression.  I had BT do the installation given all the hassel I'd had with the regular phone & ISDN lines due to RFI.  Hook up... It makes such a difference  :)
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2003, 11:54:22 am »
I "lost" my ADSL on Sunday when BT truned off my connection, along with some for other users at the same ISP. I'm still waiting for them to get their act together to turn it back on. Good old BT.
 

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