Author Topic: Youth on the street  (Read 72855 times)

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Christopher

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #120 on: May 29, 2004, 10:26:47 pm »
Having spent the last year walking through the green at about 8pm or later I have encountered many of the youths.

I can quite happily say that when I talk to them the more responsible ones try to bring the troublesome few into line.
All I had to do was talk to them as if they were young adults with a right to be respected and 'hey presto' they respect you and comply.

There are definately a couple though that  I would label  as racist and ill willed.

That's my experience any way!


 

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #121 on: May 30, 2004, 12:36:00 pm »
The latest neighbourhood watch newsletter calls on parents to do more to ensure that their children are not involved in vandalism and abusive behaviour around Bradmore Green. Click here for a copy of the newsletter.
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

Offline Birch

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #122 on: June 10, 2004, 07:58:55 pm »
Just re-read bits of this thread.  I have always thought of myself a quite liberal, but having experienced these troublesome kids and knowing how intimidated many other residents feel about them, I would readily welcome a curfew for under 16s.

Birch
 

Offline Cassie

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #123 on: June 11, 2004, 01:30:32 pm »
Why wait till it happens again?  You've been verbally abused therefore  have every right to report them now.
 

Offline Birch

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #124 on: June 11, 2004, 05:30:35 pm »
Well in theory yes. But the reality if I reported them to the police or took further action is that you would make yourselve a possible victim of a vendatta for those kids, their friends and probably their parents.  :-\  And would probably have to move out of the area.
 

Offline loopy_loo

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #125 on: March 05, 2005, 11:31:51 pm »
At long last is all I can say!  The previous 4 Friday evenings we have been besieged by youths - mainly from outside Brookmans Park who have been a real pain.  By pain I mean abusive behaviour to local people - three residents I know have been verbally abused - myself included - what for? - walking past them!  I know of a local resident who was spat on, vandalism - broken glass and graffiti, damaging property - 2 incidents including someone’s house, underage drinking etc.  I am fed up with this and I applaud a police presence to curb this idiotic behaviour.  Are these kids reasonable - well typical herd instinct so I suspect there are reasonable individuals but their overall behaviour speaks for themselves. Walking through this group 2 Fridays ago I heard one ask where they were going to score from  (the exact language was not referring to alcohol if that was not bad enough).  These are individuals who are at most 14 years old. 

I can only feel a sense of relief by the action of the police on Firday night - good to also see some of the officers stricking conversation with some of those turned back who are hopefully aware now that their behaviour is unacceptable.   

A real shame it has come to this but enough is enough.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2005, 12:07:43 am by loopy_loo »
 

Max

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #126 on: June 07, 2005, 07:35:51 am »
I've come very late to this discussion, but along with many others who have posted here, I remember hanging around on the street in BP on many occasions when I was a "yoof" c.1975. There was a youth club of sorts at the church back then, but it was the antithesis of cool, and in anycase, we could not do many of the things we really wanted to (drink, seek out sexual partners, even, I must confess, certain illicit activities probably better not discussed here). The fact is that in the UK outside of the larger cities, there is nothing much to do after the pub closes even for those old enough to get served, and even if there are some clubs, most young people cannot afford them on a regular basis. What is anyone supposed to do in much of the UK after 11:00 PM? My Greek wife thinks we are all mad!

We often ended up hanging around Gobions until the small hours, when the weather permited. We were unlikely to disturb people or be bothered by the police, and could disappear into the bushes with a willing companion on those rare occasions when such an opportunity presented itself. It was actually very pleasant a lot of the time, thinking back. I can't imagine why people would want to hang out in places like Pine Grove, though.

Of course, there is no excuse for abuse or vandalism, but I have noticed that a large number of comments posted here seem to simply address the issue of young people "hanging about". In my experience, this is simply something young people have always done and will always do, and it is best to try and remember what it was like for us (I'm talking to the other old fogeys like myself here, obviously) and not be too judgemental.

I like the notion expressed in a few previous posts that people can go to Potters Bar, or Hatfield if they want something more to do! LOL!!! I used to think, when young, that these would be good places to locate hospices, so that people with terminal illnesses could practice being dead! In fact, I still do, now I come to think of it. At least Brookmans Park is pretty, and not a place you would go looking for a night out. Welwyn Garden City had a bit of a music scene (anyone remember the Cherry Tree?) but even that was sporadic. The nearest place other than London with any life in it was St. Albans, and try getting back from there late at night by public transport (if it can be done at all, you probably have to go via Trafalgar Square and walk back from Potters Bar!)

Actually, (I don't know if this is breaking the rules so please delete if it is) there still is a reasonable local music scene in WGC. The Doctor's Tonic pub has live music in a small upstairs room, with quite a lot of local talent on display, some of which is really good. On a good night, you might catch my old mates Bob or Allan playing there and for the younger participants on this site, I must say that if the place is frequented in part by a load of aging hippies, some of the youngest looking 18 year olds I have ever seen are also very much in evidence! It is very much open to audience participation, so if you have an instrument and a few songs penned, I would recommend checking it out. The age of the performers varies between "18" and 55.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2005, 09:22:02 am by Max »
 

John_fraser

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #127 on: June 07, 2005, 09:50:53 am »
We were unlikely to ...be bothered by the police

No change there then
 

Max

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #128 on: June 07, 2005, 11:16:45 am »
I don't know. You would be surprised at how intrusive the forces of law and order could be in those days. I was once stopped by a police officer and requested, in a fairly abrupt and authoritarian manner to account for my presence in the village centre, and more specifically, to explain where I had come by the large number of books in my possession. Given that he had just seen me coming out of the library, I would have thought he might have been able to work this out for himself, but apparently not.

A good friend of mine was on three occasions requested by the Peelers to explain his presence outside a large house in Brookmans Avenue. The only flimsy argument he could produce in his defence was that he in fact lived there.

In point of fact, I never objected in principle to being stopped and questioned by the police (which happened to me on a number of occasions between 1974 and 1977, whilst simply going about my affairs and troubling no-one) but did on occasion find myself somewhat irked by the manner of their enquiries, which were a lot closer to "Oi, you.......!" than "Excuse me sir, but could you just....". With the possible exception of a few ventures into what I believe is known as "victimless crime" (an oxymoron if ever I heard one), no group of young people were ever less criminally inclined than myself and my friends, and whereas I did not necessarily expect our worthy constabulary to recognise this fact, it always struck me that many of them could have been a little more polite in their manner without relinquishing any of their legitimate authority.

Funny, but on a fairly recent trip to the UK, I was stopped in my (hired) car, a similar vehicle having aroused some suspicion in circumstances that I do not clearly recall. Their manner was faultlessly polite and respectful, and I remember wondering if this was because I was middle aged, wearing a suit and driving a brand new Mazda 6, rather than being a teenager, carrying an electric guitar, with hair down to my armpits and an Afghan coat (remember them?), as had formerly been the case.

The point has already been made below, but I will repeat it. A good way to encourage anti-social behaviour in young people is to treat them as if the mere fact that they are young and following a popular youthful trend in clothing is an indication of actual or potential wrongdoing.
 
 

Mary_Morgan

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #129 on: June 07, 2005, 08:06:24 pm »
Time passes on.   10 years before Max's friend was stopped outside his house in BP Avenue, if I had been stopped outside my house in BB Road or even outside a friends house in BP Avenue, the police would have known who I was anyway.  We had  "real" community police officers. 

Max's last paragraphs is oh so right - do not judge by appearance alone, some of these kids on the street are great kids, and doing no harm at all, just getting a breath of fresh air.   

And has been said plenty of times, it is up to the parents to assist people like James (who does so much) to provide incentive and education to encourage young people to embrace good rather than not so good.

Mary
 

Offline Oly

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Friday 17th June-the Village
« Reply #130 on: June 18, 2005, 12:08:29 pm »
Suprised to see a good police presence in the village, about 6 cops walking around. Aparently there was going to be a fight between hatfield chavs and another group, looks like their plan was foiled. Hopefully they will get the idea that none of them are welcome in BP, they can always stick to crackfield (Hatfield). There was a group of around 40 outside of BP last nite

Editor's Note: This thread has been merged with an existing thread on this issue.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2005, 04:29:16 pm by Editor »
 

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #131 on: June 20, 2005, 10:31:00 pm »
Police are urging parents to remind their sons and daughters to behave responsibly in and around Gobions Open Space after a resident saw a youth take a bottle from a reycling bin and smash it against a wall. Click here for more details.

The incident was reported in the latest Brookmans Park and Little Heath Neighbourhood Watch newsletter.  Click here to read the latest newsletter.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2005, 08:17:49 am by Editor »
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

inda_loft

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #132 on: June 27, 2005, 11:00:01 am »
suppose your gonna moan about the people who sit gobians in their cars having a couple of joints after work instead of a pint. I'm not talking about about the hoodz who play their stereo loud and make mess and annoy people but those of us who keep quiet and just have a chat abd that.
 

Offline Dubhagan

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #133 on: July 13, 2005, 01:35:55 pm »
I too have noticed the young people meeting up on the green. It seems to me that more seating is required.
Dubhagan.
 

Max

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Re: Friday 17th June-the Village
« Reply #134 on: July 20, 2005, 11:12:49 pm »
Hopefully they (Hatfield "chavs") will get the idea that none of them are welcome in BP, they can always stick to crackfield (Hatfield). There was a group of around 40 outside of BP last nite

Too true! Can't have the proles invading BP now can we? Perhaps we could introduce pass laws forbidding persons of insufficient sophistication from entering the village? Such people could perhaps be identified by their inability to spell simple words such as "night"?

 

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Re: Youth on the street
« Reply #135 on: August 03, 2005, 03:10:45 pm »
Young people are being invited to give their views as to how communications with Hertfordshire police can be improved.  Hertfordshire Constabulary says the initiative is aimed at helping the police serve the community better. Click here for more information.
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

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