Author Topic: Dangerous dogs  (Read 8491 times)

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Offline Editor

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Dangerous dogs
« on: November 01, 2004, 10:37:27 am »
A plea to owners of large dogs. If you own such an animal, would you consider keeping it on its leash when walking it in the countryside please? Many owners do, but some don't.

On recent weekends I met a large Doberman Pincher and two Alsatians while walking in the Great Wood. In one case the dog stopped, stared and stood its ground, in the other the dog ran at us and only stopped when the owner yelled, came over, and tugged the animal away.

The owners in both cases seemed oblivious to the fear the situation created. One suggested their pet would never hurt anyone. Nobody can know this. The only safe option must be to keep large and potentially dangerous dogs on their leash.

Has anyone else felt similarly intimidated?
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Offline Cassie

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2004, 06:40:27 pm »
Yes ::)
 

strata

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2004, 07:18:17 pm »
Yes I agree. These dogs can be very intimidating, barking and growling and running. Some are even bigger than children.
 

Offline eric

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2004, 10:20:13 am »
(I wonder if this might take over from "dog mess", "4x4s", etc ?)

How do people choose their dogs ?  
for need ?(not many flocks round here)   companionship ?   protection ?   image/status ?

Are larger breeds chosen more for the latter than for any other reason ?

Once chosen, is it assumed that because the larger dog needs its exercise, it must be allowed to run free wherever its owner chooses rightly or wrongly ?  (and you are dog-ist, if you query this ?)    And is it because the owners don't want to actually have to WALK the extra distance themselves nor pick up the mess when it falls ?

(now stand back for the fireworks)
 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2004, 11:35:13 pm »
No fireworks (until Friday  ;)) because I agree with you, completely. You only have to park yourself on one of the benches at Gobions open space one Saturday at any time and you'll see the quantity of dogs just left to run free. And the owners "conveniently" walk in the opposite direction or meet some friends and have a chat, so don't see what their pooch has just done in the middle of the grass.

ATG
Confucius he say "a dog is for life not just for Christmas Dinner"
 

Offline Spurs fan

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2004, 05:07:18 pm »
I have also seen a dog-walker in 'charge' of about 8-10 dogs. She can't possibly keep an eye on them all, so they must leave 'deposits' around that she doesn't pick up. Plus, some of them are quite big, so the person who had felt intimidated by large dogs has maybe also come across them? I know I don't like being surrounded by dogs, and I'm a dog person!
 

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2007, 12:35:06 pm »
A friendly plea to dog owners

If your dog has not yet been trained to walk off the lead and does not yet respond to your commands, would you please consider keeping it on the lead when walking in public places until it is properly trained?

I walk a lot in the local countryside and I am frequently bothered (and at times frightened) by dogs running at me. Yesterday an aggressive mongrel ran around me, growling and snapping at my heels while the owner voiced apologies that he had “only just got the dog.” A few weeks ago, a Doberman blocked my path, stared at me and bared its teeth, forcing me to go back the way I had already walked. And today, a black Labrador ran at me and jumped all over me covering me in mud and slobber.

It’s no use the owners telling me that “he wouldn’t hurt you”, or “she is only being friendly.” I don’t know that when the animal is running at me. And to tell the truth, neither do they.

Many dogs are well trained and walk off the lead and ignore other people, and it’s great to see a responsible dog owner out for a walk in the countryside with their pet, however there are others that should be kept on the lead until they understand it is not acceptable to attack or jump up on strangers.

Thanks

David
« Last Edit: August 30, 2008, 09:19:25 am by David Brewer »
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Offline AnneK

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2008, 12:26:55 pm »
Is anyone missing a pair of gingery Staffordshire bull terriers? (I think that's what they are, but I'm not up on my dog breeds.) They were running free on Golf Course Road and followed me down most of Georges Wood Road 15 minutes ago. Neither dog has any identification, but one has an electronic box on its collar.

I tried to lure both dogs into my back garden with some biscuits, but they weren't interested and headed off towards Pine Grove, where I hope they'll stay. They're good-looking dogs and seem gentle enough - but they were wandering all over the road, and I'm quite concerned about what will happen to them if they end up on the A1000.
 

Offline Ann

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2008, 12:28:19 pm »
I have heard that there has been another dog attack in Gobions, although it has not been confirmed.
I would be grateful if anyone has information about this. As  I will be walking a dog in Gobions next week and have concerns especially as the dog  is not mine!.. anyway, it is a terrible experience for all concerned. Thanks
 

Offline Mermaid

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2008, 12:54:22 pm »
With my Moderator's hat on I must ask that if anyone wishes to add to this discussion, please only give known facts such as date, time, place etc rather than rumour or supposition. In particular, please do not try to identify individuals or breed of dog. You are, however, welcome to IM Ann with any details you think relevant.

On that note, if anyone has any concerns about the behaviour of dogs in Gobions, then may I suggest that information is given directly to our Community Police Officer Jo Wakelen, who will presumably be able to pass it to the 'Dog Warden' to deal with.

With my BP resident's hat on, I would like to know who the Dog Warden is and whether he/she ever patrols Gobions!  Bob H and Peter H, do you know the answer?

 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2008, 04:31:52 pm »
Speaking of dog wardens, I did notice the other day that the fine mentioned on the sticker on the poo bins is now £1,000!!! Has anyone been prosecuted or fined? Would it change people's behaviour if it was £10,000? Or life imprisonment?????

ATG
Confucius he say "a dog is for life not just for Christmas Dinner"
 

Offline Ann

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2008, 12:45:22 pm »
I have just read 'Dealing with dog problems'.
The fact there is no advice on what should happen if one dog bites another. Lets hope most people have their dogs insured.
Or perhaps take a photo of the incident..multi media it to the Police or dog warden... thats if you can galvanize yourself to take one at such a time. Then consult a Solicitor.
 

Offline stevea

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2008, 02:16:15 am »
I've been reading all the information regarding the issues raised on the main page of the Newsletter regarding dogs.  There are quite a few pointers to add.  The three main reasons for aggressive dogs are;-
mistreatment, inter breeding and not being de-sexed.  Mistreatment is a hard one to deal with. Inter breeding is more a case of educating the public of who and where to buy a dog from. Inter breeding causes all sorts of serious problems including obvious defects and brain disfunction which results in aggression. De-sexing is paramount unless someone is a dog breeder. The dogs are less prone to wander and fight and it reduces territorial and anti social behaviour and sexual frustration. Not sure about the UK, but over here, our licence cost is reduced if a dog is desexed, in fact, they are thinking of making de-sexing compulsory as well as micro chipping, for dogs and cats.  Dogs bark and howl for a reason - a bit like humans - sad, lonely, hungry, mistreated, sexually frustrated, talking to or calling for a mate or simply protecting their territory. Dog poo is quite simply the responsibility of the owner as is overall control of a dog. If you're thinking of buying a dog the golden rules are, always go to a registered and reputable breeder, someone you can trust or the RSPCA, take the puppy to a training school, have it micro chipped and de-sexed. Puppies are like little children - teach them young at the beginning and you shouldn't have too many problems! I have a Staffordshire Bull Terrier and an English Bull Terrier - these breeds were bred for fighting originally and have a bad name. I followed the golden rules and they are the most placid and obedient dogs you could come across. 
 

Offline Ann

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2008, 10:44:20 am »
Many of the problems a dog has are the result of the owners.
A vet once told my father that it was not the patients that were the problem it was their owners.
Take some owners who reward bad behaviour ' for an esay life' this does the dog no favours as the animal then thinks he is the 'PACK LEADER'  will not obey and as a result they can become a menace to other dogs and their owners.
Still this is a contentious issue and will continue many a debate.
 

Offline stevea

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2008, 12:07:18 pm »
Ann - You're absolutely right - it's not the dog, it's the owner. I've had a few instances where I've seen dogs fight in our local dog park.  The only way to break them up was to get stuck in as well - it's not the way to go  but when you're in the middle of nowhere, there's not much choice sometimes. I've always found that when dogs do fight, they're not against the human at all - and if you're bitten, its because you've got in the way.  Both times, it was two male dogs fighting over a female. Again, de-sexing would've avoided this problem.  As for being the Pack Leader, the first thing you're taught at puppy school is that you are the leader - not them.
 

Offline Bob Horrocks

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Re: Dangerous dogs
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2008, 02:15:57 pm »
In reply to Mermaid's query, dog wardens are employed by Welwyn Hatfield Council.  A serach on www.welhat.gov.uk for 'dog wardens' reveals that

'A dog is only classed as dangerous if it has bitten someone. If this is the case, please report this to the police on 0845 3300222 and advise the dog warden' at WH Council phone 01707 357000.

As for the fine of up to £1,000 for dog fouling, the warning is there so ignore it at your peril.

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