Author Topic: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre  (Read 279114 times)

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Offline BrookyP

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #720 on: November 24, 2017, 04:46:37 pm »
As its just a small install we have separated BT and EE. EE being exclusively for business use only. The double nat then not being an issue. The problem was we were not FttP in the recent rollout so opted to pitch for a data contract on EE. On EE at 70/40 The download speeds are 4 times BT and the upload 8x. With the new rollouts coming of cat 12? 4g and then gbit provision on the 5G networks i think in time we will abandon fixed line altogether. As im sure most of the country will! As soon as these 4G/5G kits become available for domestic consumption along side unlimted data tariffs I think there will be a big move over. IMHO. Cheers BP
 

Offline Purrfect

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #721 on: November 27, 2017, 01:15:55 pm »
There seems to be some confusion regarding the term “5G” so here’s my understanding as the two meanings are totally different:

“5G” is the proposed 5th generation mobile phone network beyond the current 4G mobile phone network (which is still not available to all areas of the UK). It will offer higher speeds but there is currently no fully agreed industry standard for 5G deployments in the UK and hence it will probably not be launched here for quite some time (2020 + depending on the huge financial cost?).

“5GHz” (often incorrectly referred to as “5G”) is an alternative frequency band mainly used for WiFi in your house/office/public hotspots which offers higher speeds that the legacy 2.4GHz frequency band but doesn’t travel through walls so well. So even in an average sized house, your phone/laptop might achieve a better signal for internet using 2.4GHz. Most modern devices are dual-band allowing them to choose the best band to use. (Note: 5GHz is also used for connecting buildings together for business purposes but that topic is beyond the scope of this forum).

The very fast 5GHz connection speeds mentioned in the other forum posts are only achievable for transferring data between devices within your house/office and cannot increase your internet connection speed which is fixed by your internet service provider.

For our house, the basic 29Mbps Infinity service (often much faster) which is contracted via EE but totally unrelated to EE’s mobile service, is perfectly sufficient for streaming iPlayer, kids on Xbox and working from home concurrently and hence we haven’t upgraded to the higher speed Infinity/EE FTTC and certainly don’t need the full fibre to the premises FTTP service. A simple mains Powerline adapter provides perfect WiFi coverage upstairs.
 

Offline BrookyP

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #722 on: November 27, 2017, 01:24:07 pm »
yes thats correct. Its worth nothing that 2.4.ghz bandwith is better at penetrating walls etc so can travel furthur in a house. 5ghz is certainly faster but cant go as far in a house as its interrupted more by obstacles. This is why a lot of people have to get extenders in order to benefit from 5ghz ac wifi.

I only need hi speed for work uses and i agree that the 20/5 provision we have in the house is certainly more than adequate for streaming HD TV Etc. FTTP is complete overkill at the moment for most domestic users. It wont be in the future however as providers start streaming 4k and higher resolution internet radio etc. ta bp
 

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