Author Topic: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre  (Read 279135 times)

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Offline Dem

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #180 on: January 12, 2008, 05:50:04 pm »
This might be a really silly question ( ;D), but.............................

As some of you now know, I will be moving into a house in Hawkshead lane, which currently does not have the phone connected (so, no existing phone number I can check).  I'm hoping that broadband service is no problem with the existing phone lines along the road?

Thanks!

Dem.
 

Offline chicken legs

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #181 on: January 12, 2008, 08:21:41 pm »
Hello David

I didn't know you could test your speed.  Mine comes out at 522 and 243.  I'm on broadband with Tiscali in Welham Green.  Any ideas why mine is so much slower than yours?
 

Offline Editor

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #182 on: January 12, 2008, 08:29:01 pm »
Hi chicken legs,

Perhaps you are further from the exchange. Our BT exchange is Potters Bar, not sure where yours is. 522 isn't a good reading. I'd phone your ISP and have a chat with them.

David
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Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #183 on: January 13, 2008, 12:11:53 am »
I've just tested using www.speedtest.net and got 1488 down 373 up - which seems pretty good.

Strangely I don''t get near these results when using the speed test that my ISP (Plusnet) provides, the best I've got is 918 down (no test for up)

The reason I got upgraded was to use BBC iPlayer which does now seem usable from the couple of programs I've now watched.

One thing's for sure though, these so called 'up-to-8M' speeds are at best misleading....I don't know anyone who has even acheived even half that, and in a village like ours some way from the exchange it seems more like a quarter. Business packages may be better though.
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #184 on: January 13, 2008, 06:51:16 am »
Hi sasquartch, check it at different times during the day. A lot depends on how many people are online. I just got 3500 down and 360 up at 0645.

David
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John_fraser

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #185 on: January 13, 2008, 08:05:03 am »
This might be a really silly question ( ;D), but.............................

As some of you now know, I will be moving into a house in Hawkshead lane, which currently does not have the phone connected (so, no existing phone number I can check).  I'm hoping that broadband service is no problem with the existing phone lines along the road?

Not a silly question at all.

The short answer is that you should be able to check the service via Sam Knows, although it may recomend you check with BT if you are near the end of the line.

The phone exchange is at the far end of Billy Lows Lane in Potters Bar, so you will be towards the end of the line. The Line follows the road, but as it stretches down Bluebridge Road and still provides ADSL it should  reach your new house. And because your house is further away from the Bell Bar transmitter you might have fewer problems.
 

Offline Largey

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #186 on: January 13, 2008, 02:38:25 pm »
Dem,

We are further along the road from you and have a strong ADSL connection without any real issues. 3mb +
I hope you are looking forward to moving in over this way. It is a nice part of the world. Although we have a busy A1 close by, the countryside and extensive walks coupled with a great deal of privacy when you want it, makes for a nice place to stay.

Regards,

Paul
 
 

Offline Jane B

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #187 on: January 14, 2008, 08:41:18 am »
Hi Dem

From what you have said in previous posts it sounds like we are nearly opposite so welcome to the area - like Paul said it really is a lovely place to live - & the neighbours made us very welcome when we moved in.

With regards to Broadband I have to admit though - I did have a few problems when I first set up Broadband due to distances but it now seems to work fine - the speed is 1.4mb which isnt great but just over a year ago it was only .5!

Not being a computer tech I cant give you anymore info I'm afriad but hopefully if you have a new line you may get a stronger signal.

Best of luck & hope the move goes smoothly.  :)

Jane
 

Offline Bob Horrocks

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #188 on: January 14, 2008, 12:36:00 pm »
Using John Fraser's suggestion I tried 'Sam Knows' with this result.

'Our line test indicates that you are in a broadband enabled area and your line can support a speed of around 5.0Mb withAOL, Tiscali, Pipex, Orange, BT, Plusnet, Eclipse.  There are some suppliers that should be able to provide faster speeds. These are: Be Unlimited (up to 24Mb), O2 (up to 24Mb), Sky (up to 16Mb)'

I live on Swanley Bar Lane which is about a mile nearer the Potters Bar exchange than Catalina Fields on Hawkshead Lane.

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #189 on: January 14, 2008, 01:51:17 pm »
The relative distance between Swanley Bar Lane and Catalina Field is only a VERY rough guide as the cables may take a completely different route.

From my investigations when I first tried to get broadband about 3 years ago revealed that Peplins Way is served by cables that come along the A1000, and at some point join Moffats lane then onto the village. Obviously this isn't the route that you'd normally drive if you were going to Potters Bar.

It seems that there are actually very few properties that cannot get ADSL at all, it's just a question of speed.
 

Offline Big Red Daddy

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #190 on: January 14, 2008, 11:17:24 pm »
Has anyone else had problems with there broadband service lately. We can't get on line with BT the moment. I'll call Tuesday to check, but was hoping someone might have called already
Thanks
 

Offline Clean Up Kid

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #191 on: January 15, 2008, 12:30:43 pm »
Our intermittent service from bt broadband, which we put up with for about 3 years finally came to a head last year when we were off line for about 3 weeks. We skipped past the useless overseas call centre and instead opted for the "sales" option  - bingo, someone who was prepared to listen to our problems and take it further. Bt finally agreed to send out an engineer and all our problems with our broadband service were instantly resolved simply by him transfering the point of entry of the phone line from an upstairs bedroom, to our downstairs study where the computer lives, and sticking on a different filter.
We were fobbed off countless times with distance from exchange/proximity of B Pk transmitters/no. of phone extensions in the house etc etc, but since the engineer visited us we have had no probs and a good fast service(touch wood!). I'm no computer techie or BT expert, but I think the only solution to broadband probs is to INSIST on a engineer visit - not easy, but works.
Oh, and for our troubles, we were reimbursed 3 months service charge, nor charged for the engineer callout.
Good luck....!
 

Offline Big Red Daddy

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #192 on: January 15, 2008, 03:38:04 pm »
Thanks for the info, we'll give it a try and let you know how it goes
 

Offline hilarycarlen

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #193 on: January 20, 2008, 12:47:41 am »
We recently had a load of on-off problems till BT came and tracked it to the phone cable from the pole to the house - it was completely corroded in places, with the plastic sleeve completely disintegrated, and the wires underneath all rusting - when I saw it, I was amazed we got any phone at all, never mind broadband.  i assume that much of the local phone cabling is the same vintage, so worth getting this checked when you get the engineer in.  We have had no problem at all ever since.
 

Offline JESB

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #194 on: January 21, 2008, 07:30:44 am »
We have had loads of problems with connections from 3pm in the afternoon until midnight not being able to access the web at all.  This all transpired after the last power cut we had a couple of weeks ago.  My pC man thinks its the server.  The server thinks its the wireless router and BT don't know! any ideas! Must admit since the power cut we seem to be on a lower voltage at home. Has anyone else noticed it, lights seem dimmer, cooker does not seem to be so hot etc. We are top end of moffats.
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #195 on: January 21, 2008, 09:31:04 am »
Quote
it was completely corroded in places

A lot of the telephone wiring in BP is aluminium which is prone to this sort of thing.

Apparently in the 1950s when many houses in the area was built (my house in Peplins Way included) there was a worldwide shortage of copper and aluminium was often used as a substitute.
 

Offline Nobby

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #196 on: January 21, 2008, 01:43:58 pm »
We were supposed to go online with Talk broadband on July 30th. We have had 3 ineffectual visits from BT engineers; we have changed the main phone socket so that it's connected direct to the PC, yet we have never had more than 10 days of continuous usage. In total we have had no more than 30 days in the 6 months when we should have had a broadband connection.
We also have terrible interference on the phone line -it's so bad that I can actually listen to football commentaries on Talk Sport and could sing along with the music from an Asian radio station, if I knew the words.

Talk's support has been abysmal, but the clear villains of the piece are BT who still own the line between our house and the exchange.  An ex-telecoms engineer friend of mine says the problem is almost certainly the ancient wiring installed by BT which then leads to induction (i.e. where signals travelling along one line contaminate other lines). BT are quite happy to rent out their lines to other broadband suppliers knowing full well that the line is not fit for purpose. They are quite happy to see their competitors suffer damage to their reputations through customers' inability to get a connection. To cap it all Talk has advised me that I may have to go back to BT as a customer, as only then will they be compelled to fix the line.
This is appalling sharp practice, but is entirely in keeping with BT's past history of over-charging, and delivering a sub-standard service.
Any advice would be greatfully appreciated.
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #197 on: January 21, 2008, 02:20:27 pm »
To be fair to BT there may not be much they can do in some cases.

I have no idea where you live in BP but in Peplins Way there was a shortage of 'pairs' available in the street cabling. Over time, some pairs become faulty and others get used for second lines etc. In fact quite a few houses were fitted with DACS boxes (can't remember what the initials stand for but it enables two phone circuits to use a single pair) which aren't compatible with broadband anyway.

Therefore the situation when BT has to struggle with making the best use of the limited number of circuits available is some people may have problems.

Of course, BT should (and are gradually will) upgrade the cable in the ground but realistically that can't happen overnight.

If you are having trouble with radio interference you can approach the transmitter station - the operator (I think National Grid Wireless) were extremely helpful when I had a problem with a cordless phone and provided filters free of charge. If you just drive into the main building off the A1000 and ask at reception I am sure they will be happy to assist.

As far as BT being obliged to rectify the broadband problem I am not sure that is the case. It always used to be the case (it was 4 years ago when I had some initial problems getting broadband) that BT would only guarantee the line was workable for voice, other services were not guaranteed to be available and always 'subject to survey'

Lastly I have heard of many people having problems with TalkTalk (not sure if the forum rules allow me to say this) - my opinion is that a lot of these 'free' services have terrible backup when things don't work and very restrictive contracts. It's sometimes a case of you get what you pay for.

If you have had only 30 days in 6 months of service then TalkTalk are possibly in breach of contract. Of course, probably the worst thing about ADSL is that you need a code to transfer your service to another ISP and this has to be issued by the ISP you are trying to get rid of, and they can effectively hold you to ransom.
 

Offline Mermaid

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #198 on: January 21, 2008, 03:57:47 pm »
Every week I read the 'readers' problems' letters in the Indy and the Sunday Times and TalkTalk crops up a surprising number of times.

Today, Simon Carr has written the following in The Indy:

" There is a risk that we victims of telecommunications companies will finally give in to primitive urges and form our own militia.

Several readers have written with their experiences of TalkTalk. The common theme was... far too much talktalk (along with screamscream and crycry) and hour upon hour listening to the tinny version of "We're Gonna Do It Together". Maybe that'll be the battle cry of our militia?

But writing to Charles Dunstone, who runs this company, seems to have no effect. He just doesn't reply.

All right, we're not going to form a militia. Here's a better idea.

Charge them for your time. Send them a bill for 127. When they don't pay, file at the small claims court. If the company doesn't turn up to defend itself, you'll probably get judgement in your favour.

Let me know if you do it and I'll come along and cover the case for the paper".

simoncarr@sketch.sc
 

Offline Clean Up Kid

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #199 on: January 22, 2008, 12:06:46 am »
We were supposed to go online with Talk broadband on July 30th. We have had 3 ineffectual visits from BT engineers; we have changed the main phone socket so that it's connected direct to the PC, yet we have never had more than 10 days of continuous usage. In total we have had no more than 30 days in the 6 months when we should have had a broadband connection.
We also have terrible interference on the phone line -it's so bad that I can actually listen to football commentaries on Talk Sport and could sing along with the music from an Asian radio station, if I knew the words.

Talk's support has been abysmal, but the clear villains of the piece are BT who still own the line between our house and the exchange.  An ex-telecoms engineer friend of mine says the problem is almost certainly the ancient wiring installed by BT which then leads to induction (i.e. where signals travelling along one line contaminate other lines). BT are quite happy to rent out their lines to other broadband suppliers knowing full well that the line is not fit for purpose. They are quite happy to see their competitors suffer damage to their reputations through customers' inability to get a connection. To cap it all Talk has advised me that I may have to go back to BT as a customer, as only then will they be compelled to fix the line.
This is appalling sharp practice, but is entirely in keeping with BT's past history of over-charging, and delivering a sub-standard service.
Any advice would be greatfully appreciated.
we used bt as a broadband supplier knowing the potential problems of the area...incidentally, bt broadband are a completely separate company to bt, and so in many respects you may as well go to another broadband supplier - we assumed they all came under the same umbrella and so would be our best option for broadband services. Not the case, however we did manage to get to the md's office by going via the "sales" option on the phone and finally getting someone to listen to us, as i said earlier in this thread. We had both a bt engineer and his "friend" who worked for bt broadband both sorting out our very intermittent service, i dunno what they did aside from re-siting the point of entry of the phone line but it has worked. Please persist with bt and take it as high as possible and insist on an engineer. They will fob you off with "we do not send engineers" etc but please persist, our broadband problems have been completely resolved since we had an engineer. Good luck to anyone trying to resolve the mayhem that is broadband!
 

Offline Nobby

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #200 on: March 09, 2008, 08:12:35 pm »
Thanks very much for your advice Sasquartch and Clean Up Kid.
My broadband issue seems to have been resolved - although for how long is anyone's guess. I ended up going to Ofcom who advised me to insist that Talk provide details of their Alternate Dispute Resolution process. It is their statutory duty to do so, apparently. I actually got a call from Talk within five working days and a promise to resolve the issue. Yesterday 3 BT engineers turned up, replaced the phone wire from my house to the telegraph pole and did some work on the line at the box on the junction of Bluebridge Road and Hawkshead Lane. The radio interference on the line has gone and my broadband worked first time.
Enormous relief. I hope the solution is a permanent one.

 
 

Offline Johnny Redd

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #201 on: March 12, 2008, 01:05:50 pm »
Hello All,

We have just got back online, just, after losing all broadband about 1am on Wednesday 27th Feb (the night of the earthquake).

We have lost all ability to use a wireless router and the after a visit from a BT phoneline engineer and numerous attempts with other hardware the connection will now only work with a very basic BT Voyager ADSL Modem at a noticeably slower pace.

Has anybody else experienced similar problems in BPK generally and Peplins in particular??????

Thats supposing you can read this at all, of course............
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #202 on: March 12, 2008, 02:08:15 pm »
I'm in Peplins and have no problems.

If you're having problems with the wireless bit it's nothing to do with the phone line, more likely a problem with your router or computer(s)

If you're really stuck let me know !!

If you're going to buy a new router I'd recommend a Netgear 834GT or similar, I've had lots of problems with various other makes and would certainly avoid any USB types.
 

Offline Johnny Redd

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #203 on: March 12, 2008, 02:20:19 pm »
I've tried 2 pc's (desktop and laptop), 2 routers (d-link DSL-604+ and linksys WAG200g) and 2 modems (zoom and BT voyager 105) and only the voyager works. The previous router was a Belkin54g and that worked without problems until the power adapter blew (judging by the smell anyway) on the night in question.

If you think the netgear product will work then i'd be happy to try it but i am left wondering why all the above wont work when the common denominator would seem to be adsl signal???
 

Offline Johnny Redd

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #204 on: March 12, 2008, 02:22:39 pm »
Sorry, I would add that the common theme running through the non workers was that the "ADSL" or "LINK" light would not illuminate on any of the modems/routers. Basically it wouldn't sync.
 

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #205 on: March 12, 2008, 02:46:34 pm »

The previous router was a Belkin54g and that worked without problems until the power adapter blew (judging by the smell anyway) on the night in question.


Hi Johnny,

I have a spare Belkin54g wireless modem router if you want to borrow it and try it out. Send me a personal message if you want to pop round and pick it up.

David
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Offline saffie

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #206 on: April 01, 2008, 01:58:31 pm »
I think I am having similar problems.  BB works fine through my old basic USB router, but I can only get my new Netgear (one that Virgin supply) router to work via the test socket.  Will not work in any other extension, anyone got any ideas????
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #207 on: April 01, 2008, 02:39:54 pm »
Sounds like microfilters to me.

You need a filter for EVERY phone in the house, including modems, Sky boxes etc as well as extension phones.
 

Offline saffie

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #208 on: April 05, 2008, 01:47:56 pm »
Done that and checked everything so many times.
 

Offline sasquartch

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Re: Village broadband and high-speed optic fibre
« Reply #209 on: April 05, 2008, 03:03:30 pm »
If it's the case that the modem works OK when plugged directly into the BT master socket with the house wiring removed (I assume this is what you mean by the test socket) then it points to a problem with the internal wiring.

If you plug a microfilter directly into the BT test socket does it work, if so does it still work with a phone plugged into it ?

It's possible also that your Netgear modem is incorrectly set up, look for the VPI/VCI values are set to 0 and 38 and that PPPoA is selected. What model of modem is it ?

Is there an RF filter in the phone line fitted to minimise interference from the transmitter station ? These are a common source of problems.
 

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