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Author Topic: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms  (Read 592298 times)

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Offline Editor

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2002, 10:56:59 am »
Quote
Saw  a huge owl in moffats last week, it was well over 2FT tall 5ft wingspan, I would swear it was an eagle owl, escaped? What an experience! height judged against chimney brick courses.

Jet, could it have been a female Tawny Owl, which I understand from the World Owl Trust, and also Owl Pages, could have a wing-span of almost 4ft?
« Last Edit: June 30, 2002, 11:01:32 am by admin »
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John_fraser

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2002, 10:57:46 am »
Your logic is a bit off. Firstly 49,000 Hones is not 49,000 families. One of the reasons – the population isn’t rising that fast - the homes are supposed to be needed is that people are living on their own longer i.e. the majority probably won’t be family homes, secondly many of these “new” families are already here, living in shared homes or homes too small for their needs.

That said the points are well made, the existing infrastructure is always left to support the majority of the expanded need.  But we need not worry here, for a house to be “affordable” in BP, it would have to be about the size of a rabbit hutch
 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2002, 12:11:21 am »
Nice to hear from you again jet. I've lost count of the number of trees, both forest and ornamental that have been pruned at ground level over the last 20 or so years. I can remember clearly when Mymms Drive and Georges Wood Road were avenues, but it seems that everybody is hell bent on tree removal as soon as they move in to the area. Is it because the leaves/needles are too much to sweep up?

You can predict the process:

1. For Sale board goes up
2. Sold sticker goes on
3. New people move in
4. Skip arrives outside, builders start work
5. Old kitchen and bedroom units go into skip
6. Front garden is cleared away (including trees and shrubs) and a big new driveway installed for parking the new toys on. I've seen good york stone paving in skips because the new owners preferred concrete blocks!
7. New residents drive aforementioned new toys around as if they are at Brands Hatch
8. For Sale board goes up a few years later


Aye, things have certainly changed (and don't get me onto my favourite subject of car/bicycle relations).

ATG
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Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2002, 05:36:47 pm »
Perhaps you should put gates up all around Brookmans Park and vet everyone that comes in and check they come up to your standard? Put a clause in that no-one is allowed to improve their property, or buy big cars.

Life is about change, things can't stay the same for ever. And what is so wrong with improving your surroundings?  Are you suggesting we keep the same kitchens for years? I don't see what this has to do with the greenbelt.  I must say as a newcomer to the village, you make people feel most unwelcome.  I happen to feel this is a very pretty area, and its wonderful to see people taking so much care of their properties and frontage.

And I'm afraid sometimes tree's do have to come down! I love the trees in my garden, but sadly two had to come down because it was rotten.  Another one at the front fell down in the high winds, which was very sad, but part of looking after your area is looking after the trees and plants, if they are rotten they have to go.

As I said, I don't see what changing your house has to do with Greenbelt and the issue being discussed in this thread.  
 

Offline jet

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #34 on: July 02, 2002, 07:09:59 pm »
Dear Anna,
I will try to explain what Alf is saying, albeit perhaps in my normal clumsy way.
When I was privelleged to move here 17 years ago, the majority of building work was for maintainance ie house painting etc. If people wanted to improve they moved to a bigger house. Perhaps within the area like the writer. Now it is like living in a building site, there is not one day that someone is not building something in my road.
There was absolute politeness, children did not scream ever. Bad driving was very rare.
In short it was a pretty little village with cute lights that switched off at night and complete peace.
Front lawns that once absorbed rain water are now being blocked over creating floods.
Living trees are being ripped up for building work, they are not replaced.
Detached houses are now starting to form terraces by being extended in all directions.
People are destroying the very reason the place was so attractive.
An extended house ( I've got one as well) looks just like that extended.
A drive was a thing to take a car for every member of the familly, now it is a vast thing that turns the area any other colour but green.
In short the rural village is being turned into a suburban jungle which is exactly what people moved here to get away from.
All these things were constrained by the original deeds to all our properties. These deeds as I have just found out now take the form of Land Registry with all the old codicils which prevented "micky mouse" development having been omited.
In our road the verge was common ie 6 ft of grass to be left open, now people build right up to the road side thus turning a spacious outlook into a cramped muddle.
It is not progress to ruin things, it is retrograde.
I have no objection to tastefull extensions which enhance the property. Well as we sow so shall we reap.
There is a natural fence around BP it is called money. Unfortunately money does not equall sense.
That explains ALFs rant.
People moving here now cannot begin to understand how beautifull this village used to be. It is now an eyesore.
Well this is my weeks ration, so don't be offended if I don't reply to any comments on my post. Its a statement not a thread.
regards,
jet
addendum: In the good old days it was possible to walk around BP without the fear of being run over by high speed orange quadrupeds tearing along the road :)
« Last Edit: July 02, 2002, 09:56:50 pm by admin »
 

Astra

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #35 on: July 02, 2002, 08:49:04 pm »
I think its about time I put my two penniworth into this topic.

When I moved to Brookmans Park over 15years ago it was a nice quiet little sleepy hollow.  I could not believe my luck.  People in the shops called me 'madam' and said thank you when I shopped there.  Parking was not a problem except on village day.  Now, try parking its a nightmare.  People smile at you in the shops but the sincerity is missing.  Obviously a sign of the times.

I was so pleased to get my house in BP only to be told by someone in the village a couple of weeks later that I was living on the 'cheap side' of BP.  I though all BP was expensive - how could there be a cheap side.

I used to drive a small van.  Personal choice.  I was told I was lowering the tone of the village and could I park it out of sight of the neighbours opposite as they did not want to see it out of their window.  Snobs or what.  I was persecuted over the fence to the side of my property.  My neighbours seemed to think that I should fix this as a matter of urgency.  It did not matter to them that I had no kitchen at all at the time, that my cooker and washing machine were in the garden covered with plastic sheeting, that I was living on cold food (it was November) and doing my washing up in the bath.  Oh no - fix the fence or we will report you to the council.  Nice people or what.  These were the neighbours who were quite happy to use the verge on the other side of the fence as a dogs toilet.  Imagine the smell on a nice summers day.  I have to admit I stood up to them.  I was brought up in a fairly rough area and had never in all my life been treated so unkindly and unfairly by anyone.  I put up new gates.  The concrete on the posts was not even dry before the council were down.  Someone had reported me.  They even tried to get up a petition to get me to take them down.  They even resorted to graffiti.  The local policeman at the time (Brian) told me that he was ashamed of the way that I had been treated by people he had known for years.  My gates were even discussed at a WI meeting ! ! !

I was also told by a neighbour why I would never 'fit in' in BP.  I have no children so am not involved in the local school, I play neither golf nor tennis so am not involved there, I do not frequent the local church and do not belong to the WI.  And just to add insult to injury, I drove a van and worked full time.  As far as they were concerned, not Brookmans Parks ideal resident.

Well, I still live in BP to spite them.  I have (like JET) moved within the village.  The neighbours where I am now are on the whole just like me.

The people who live on the 'cheap side' of BP will always be small minded petty little curtain twitchers who have never quite made it in BP and will probably never make it up the hill to the 'big houses'.

As a final word, I did enjoy living in my last house.  Once they realised that they could not push me around they backed off.  Once they stopped judging me on the car I drove and found out exactly what I did for a living they left me alone.   I am a better ally than enemy.

I only hope that where I am now does not deteriorate as fast - I don't think the residents will let it - I hope they don't.

Astra
 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #36 on: July 02, 2002, 09:36:38 pm »
How sad all of this is. I never wanted to live in Hadley Wood because I didn't like the way everyone backstabbed each other and had to better than everyone else. They were so snobby, so I moved to BP, thinking I was moving to a lovely area, with nice people. Of course there are a few who pave over their lovely frontage, and pull down a few trees. But on the whole this is a very pretty area, a place I am proud to live in and feel lucky to have got here after wanting it for so long.........however, now I am here, I realise that perhaps it's no different to Hadley Wood, they don't like people extending houses because they live in fear that someone elses house might be better than theres.

To be honest I don't see what this had to do with Greenbelt.
Astra, your old neighbours sound horrible, there is no "cheap" side of BP, all the houses are expensive, and alot better than many of the surrounding areas. Its a great shame to move into an area and feel unwelcome. Something I am beginning to feel from this forum, (not my neighbours who are lovely).  Its seems I am judged on what car I drive, and how many cars I have and what size drive I want.

Sorry guys, I feel actually quite depressed today after reading these posts. Everyone I've "met" in Brookmans Park have been very nice, although not over the top friendly. Yet from reading the posts in this thread, I feel I have no right to be here. That I'm one of the "new" people, so don't belong.

Yes I need to extend on my house, its not big enough for my family, and believe me, we looked for ages to find a house that would be, I'd rather not go through the extension process! Yes I will extend my drive, so people don't have to park outside and ruin the look of the road.  I can't speak for all roads, but I take a walk up my road and its full of beauty.  I know I am lucky to be surrounded by such lovely surroundings, and I will fight to save the Greenbelt, from more development.

Anyone who has a house here, must have worked damn hard to be here.
 

John_fraser

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #37 on: July 03, 2002, 12:45:57 am »
I live in the cheaper side of BP – as Ann says there is no cheap side – and have found BP to be an excellent place to live. We’ve only been here six years, but we hope we never move. I can only conclude that JET and Alfred the Great have lived here so long that they have forgotten just how nice it is. True, Astra’s old neighbours sound a nightmare and, while I’ve not met any as bad as that I’ve met a few snobs. But on the whole the people here are excellent and there is a community spirit that is lacking in many places. I don’t mind the people in the shops not calling me sir. I actually like the fact most of them call me John.

People extend because the can afford bigger houses but want to stay here. There are areas which look just as nice, but people want to stay in the community and if you doubt there is a community spirit why are you on this forum? Why is the Village day so well attended? Why did people stand up for BPH when I attacked it?

But on the whole I’d like them to go back to turning off the street lights at 10pm. Sounds quaint and I’d like to see the stars more often

P.S.

Astra, we’re not all “small minded petty little curtain twitchers” over in the “slum.” When I moved in someone described this area as the “Hillman Imp side Brookmans Park.”  At the time I though it was an amusing remark, and I still do.
 

Offline jet

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #38 on: July 03, 2002, 01:12:25 am »
Dear John,
My point was that it used to be better when I moved in, it could be compared to the type of village one sees in 1940s-50s films. As you have only been here 6 years it would be difficult for you to grasp the change. No offense mean't and I am not trying to say you have no imagination, just no experience of how it was. It was delightfull when the lights went out, it helped one get a good nights sleep. BP is still better than the rest of the outside world, its just that it could be even better rather than the mediocre example of other places which we judge it by.
I would not describe anywhere in this village as anywhere near a slum.
By the way, you all, just read the 10 year planning plan. Do not be surprised when some of the fields around Gobions turn into an estate. Potterils was a farm? Leach fields could easilly be Leach estate. Relaxed planing on extensions is a double edged sword. The little guy thinks he is on to a winner, the developer knows he is!
regards,
jet
PS if my posts were read as they were written, with best intent rather than assuming the worst then it would be realised that I only want the best for this area and the people that live here.
 

Offline Mooniemad

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #39 on: July 03, 2002, 01:20:04 am »
 I just would like to say this. I don't own the house I live in as I'm too young. Yes I guess you could say I live on the poorer side of Brookmans Park and yes we have extended and yes we do have more than one car. To be honest I don't care what people think because they don't know whatelse we have or whatelse we have done in our life. I believe that somethings our family has, others will never be able to have or do. We may live on the poor side as you say, but how do people know we don't have family secrets or wealth elsewhere in this world. I don't think it matters what people think.
The other thing I would like to say is. As our village becomes more urbanised, the urban areas also modernise and develop in their looks.
 

Mary_Morgan

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #40 on: July 03, 2002, 01:30:50 am »
Oh dear, we have lost the plot.

Greenbelt threat?  I do not believe some of what I have been reading.

Let the Green Belt Society carry on doing the very good job they have been doing for years.    Join up, they always welcome new members.   Also CPRE The Hertfordshire Society monitor green belt county wide.

But please, this is becoming very boring, and is purely people trying to impress their values or lack of values (and I admit values are personal) and personal opinions on other people.

Neighbours from hell, grumps and snobs and Hillman Imps (much as I like them - though did prefer the Sunbeam version- went to Biarritz in one in 1970 ;)) have very little to do with the green belt.

Night folks.

Mary

Had my dirhams worth.
 

Mary_Morgan

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #41 on: July 03, 2002, 01:37:51 am »
Mooniemad,   You posted while I was typing.  

Good on you.  

Mary
(someone who enjoyed BP never having lived on the so called "richer side" - think about it - us "poor" ones live (in my case lived) nearer the station, the shops and the pub - what more could you want)
 

Astra

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #42 on: July 03, 2002, 02:10:12 am »
I really feel that I should explain myself.  I feel this is a green belt issue.

I originally come from a victorian terraced house in North London.  I moved out to the Enfield area and bought an end of terrace house.  Semi-detached sort of.  It was small but all I could afford.  I used to drive along the roads nearby looking at the 3 bedroom semi detached houses with envy wishing that I could have bought and lived in one of them  Every house had an attached garage to the side and they were all clean and tidy and sort of warm if you get my drift.

Over the ten years I was there I noticed more and more people extending to the back of their properties and also rebuilding their garages with extra rooms above.  All you see now are a row of terraced looking houses that are nothing like they were meant to be.  Also, take a close look at a house that was extended 10+ years ago.  You will notice that the house has aged at a different rate to the extension and most extensions stick out like a sore thumb and an afterthought.  We are destroying our own environment.  We are the culprits.  

We buy houses that are not what we really want and then spend a fortune changing them.  

We dont like tarmac on the drive - block pave it.  It is a proven fact that the increase in block paving in Hertfordshire is making it more difficult for rain water to drain away and is causing higher flood levels.  Plastic under block paving is not porous.  The rain does not soak into the ground and runs off to old antiquated drains that cannot cope.  Net result - floods.

We want an extra bathroom - extend - push the old sewers to the limit and them complain if the waste does not go away quick enough.

We then extend in every conceiveable direction until the houses are almost touching at the sides and then what do you have - a terrace ! ! !

Try walking down the Gardens or Westlands or Oaklands and imagine what the road looked like before everybody extended their houses.  What do you think looks best - before or after????  I know what I think about it.  I can remember what it was like and I lived over that side of Brookmans Park during the transformation.  When will this mad craze for building stop.  When will the council have the guts to say no.  Do the building lines count for nothing.

We all want to look out of our windows and see a bit of the countryside.  Surely the people looking in your direction are entitled to the same.  

If the house you are in is not what you want - find one that is.  I did.  Once you close your doors this area does not differ much from Hadley Wood or other similar areas.

Also, if this area was so nice why are there so many people breaking their necks to get away from it.  I have never in over 15 years seen so many houses for sale.  And here we go again.  More people buying houses that are not really what they want just so that they can put 'Brookmans Park' as their address, extending and altering them yet again and then moving on so the cycle can start all over again.  We are our own worst enemies.

Astra
 

Offline eric

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #43 on: July 03, 2002, 12:16:29 pm »
Well painful tho it may be for some, we're beginning to get down to some real points it seems.
Astra and JET seem to have it broadly right  -  a lot of people are spoiling the area they've moved in to, possibly by muddling new suburban features with what should be genuine rural features ?
Anna is intriguing:   1) "don't see what changing your house has to do with the green belt"  -  changing the style of garden areas and extending/ improving means you'll expect a pro-rata increase in price when you sell, moving the proportion of housing stock ever upwards and away from basic need (and other people must pay in various ways)  2) you want to preserve the Green Belt but say "life is about change, things can't stay for ever"  3)  "I agree we need more housing ..."  but if this suddenly took place next door what might be the reaction ? NIMBY or acceptance ?
Social issues ARE very much part of the overall Green Belt subject whether we like to admit or deny it.  John has touched only on some of the reasons ?
Bob wants shops to give him what he wants, rather than recognising they can only give the best they can when 90%+ of us want cheaper superstore prices whether we admit it or not ?  and to preserve 'tho leaving the implications to everyone else ?
Mary interestingly has no problem with infilling it seems  Really?
Poor old Brookmans Park Hotel must wonder from time to time whether it'd be easier just to pull down the shutters than try to earn a living wage?
I think we ARE faced with some carefully controlled small scale, well-designed developments of "cottage"-type housing that are prevented by law from being traded-up, or commuting with pollution etc etc etc will just go on and on ...?

 

Offline MC

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #44 on: July 03, 2002, 03:30:11 pm »
This thread may be becoming slightly tangential to the greenbelt argument in some ways but it is a very interesting thread all the same.

Only 2 comments for now.

Firstly the specific reference to rich and poor sides of BP I find unhelpful. In terms of the Greenbelt and in terms of housing work it is irrelevant. I was a little surprised by the apparent snob values at work in some of the posts and stories told. I have never experienced this here before........

.......however, I would probably argue that we are all a bit "snobby" around here anyway but that's another story.

Re building work and changing the character of streets then I would agree to an extent although most of the work around here seems to be fairly tastefully done.

It would certainly appear to be an imperative to extend for some people because it is virtually impossible to move within the area for those who need more space. but that's probably another story too - one that concerns propery bubbles and when they will burst.

I remember talking to an estate agent here recently and he commented that people who extend in order to sell and realise the profit are really kidding themselves. They buy for say 300K and feel good when they sell for 400K - however the reality is the extension cost 60K and the original house would have gone up 40K anyway therefore no profit but 4 months of brick dust etc for their trouble.

His advice is to buy the size house you want in the first place. While I agree with the opening argument it's tough to agree with the advice especially for those already in properties who genuinely want more space.  It's just too expensive to move. Which explains all the building work !!

And as to property bubbles who saw Panorama? There are some arguments that house prices are going to crash but on the other hand it's a supply and demand issue. It is projected there will soon be more households than houses. Prices aren't going to go down in that scenario so the present situation will continue but with the addition that more houses will be built per Govt plans.

Basically guys the UK is just over-crowded !!

MC












 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #45 on: July 03, 2002, 04:24:26 pm »
Just to add a little to MC's post. If you really do want to have a go at someone about all the extensions, then start with the govenment. They have made it too expensive to move with such high stamp duty. For a house costing £500,000, you are looking at about £20,000 in tax.........thats goes a long way towards an extension!  So at the moment, it is cheaper to stay put and extend rather than move. And Eric, lets not forget the "workers" as you say are getting a lot of work right now from all the building work.
 

Offline Mooniemad

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #46 on: July 03, 2002, 05:21:06 pm »
 I was telling my parents about this topic and they told me of a little incident which they experienced when moving in. They were also told to get out the village as they didn't belong here. They were told the area didn't need people like them letting it down. They were told that they had no involvement in the village life.
Well they were wrong, since one of my long lost relatives owned one of the first shops in the village. I believe it was known as Moon Stores or something like that.
On this page you moan about the gradual increase in extensions, but then how do you know this arguement wasn't brung about when this village was built. Along time ago this area wouldn't have been built up as much as it is today. Therefore the changes have been significant. That would mean there is no right or wrong. The village therefore possibly shouldn't have been built, but it was. If you all had your way we would all be living in the past with no developments or structures. I would also like to ask those who have problems with the extensions if they also have problems with peoples gardens, because I have seen people bring new species of plants into their gardens. They have added various features. These changes to the gardens surely have ruined the original village characteristics.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2002, 05:26:10 pm by Mooniemad »
 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #47 on: July 03, 2002, 05:35:43 pm »
Mooniemad, I just wanted to congratulate you on your post. For someone so young you have a very wise head on your shoulders and put many of us to shame.

 

Offline jet

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #48 on: July 03, 2002, 07:33:44 pm »
Dear Mooniemad,
I am going to be devils advocate as per usual and for the benifit of the uninformed it means I am opening up a debate with an opinion that may not be my own, but which shows it from a different aspect.
Is there any chance, (not that it matters) that your family did not fit in for any reason, did your lifestyle affect a neighbours esablished existance.
For instance when I lived in Hillman Imp Land ( There is still one there if you look) I had bonfires. The man next door had them to, and we caused no nuisance to each other, by having them at night.
When I moved up the hill shall we say, the first thing my wife got from our neighbours was . " we do this we don't do that ( no bonfires) etc" With arrogance we said that we did what we liked. Well we learn't that we were in fact offensive to inflict our smoke on people and stopped. It got easier and cleaner just to take it down the dump. So we actually learnt by being considerate.
It may be worth considering that some older people have fires because they are not physically able to dispose of their rubish in any other way, it may be worth people offering to help with the disposal, If you are taking your own down the dump does it hurt to take someone elses as well?
Any way most problems are missunderstandings, they happen every day on this forum, a word missing/added or incorrect punctuation.
All I know is that its summer ( believe it or not) and I have four construction sites in earshot, when I moved here for peace.
Before someone says this is off thread, it is about the gren belt ,we are in it. If we cannot control ourselves then we cannot expect others to consider us.
Perhaps we need a pot pouri or general winge thread, now that would soon fill the computer :)
regards,
jet
PS it used to be when people moved in to a new area they quietly blended in to get the lie of the land. Now its seems to be I'm here s*d the lot of you a bit Prescotty ;D
 

Astra

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #49 on: July 03, 2002, 07:59:05 pm »
Firstly let me clarify one point.  Iseem to have offended some people with my comment about the cheaper side of Brookmans Park.  Read my post ! ! !  I was TOLD that I lived on the cheaper side.  I personally do not think that there is a cheaper side to Brookmans Park but there are a lot of snobby people who live in Brookmans Avenue, Georges Wood Road etc who seem to think that they are better than for example the residents in The Gardens, Oaklands and that area.  I think that these are sad sorry people who should get a life.

Astra
 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #50 on: July 03, 2002, 07:59:40 pm »
There is no need for bonfires. The council now take your garden waste away, all you have to do is buy green bags.
Or if you really care about the enviroment you can start a compost heap.
 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #51 on: July 03, 2002, 08:07:05 pm »
This is just a suggestion but perhaps its best not to name roads Astra. There are both good and bad in all roads. Lets not make it personal.

I have to say, I met someone recently at a party in Barnet, we got talking and he said he lived in Brookmans Park, when I said I did as well, he replied to me........." Well I live in the cheap bit" I just laughed and said there isn't a cheap bit. I don't think any property can be discribed as cheap anymore!

It doesn't matter how much anyones house cost, the fact is, its problably one of the biggest investments we ever make and we should all look after that and the surrounding area.  Lets not get personal by pointing fingers at people who have had extensions, or taken a tree down. I'm sure everyone had valid reasons for these things.....its not for us to judge. But we can try to stop further development. What makes Brookmans Park so nice, is that each Road is different and has its own charm.  The houses are pretty and well kept........I would hate to see a whole estate built with all brand new identical housing with postage stamp gardens..........surely this is what we should be fighting against?


Lets all stop pointing fingers at each other, and trying to blame others. Lets fight to save what we have, and stop the village becomming a town and a concrete jungle.
 

Astra

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #52 on: July 03, 2002, 08:22:01 pm »
Anna

I will name roads as that is the crux of the point.

We will all end up with postage stamp gardens if we keep extending our houses beyond building lines.  They were put there to stop us creating a needless concrete jungle.

Also, when I lived on the other side of Brookmans Park I was approached by a developer who wanted to buy the end of my garden and 3 of my neigh bours were also approached.  The two furthest from me said yes, the neighbour next to me said he would go with the majority and I said no.  The reason I said no - the house they were planning to build would hev been at the end of my garden and the garden of the neighbour next door.  The garden on the new property would have been at the end of the other two houses.  Also, without my agreement they did not have access so I said no.  I think I was right and we are talking ten years ago.  If we all did that can you imagine what BP would look like.  It would be a mess.  We must preserve our green and pleasant land otherwise the next generation will have nothing.

Also, can I ask Anna one question.  Please do not take this as a personal insult.  Are you defending the builders and developers because perhaps you personnaly have had an extension built, a block drive laid and maybe knocked down a few trees along the way.

Astra
 

Offline Mooniemad

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #53 on: July 03, 2002, 10:40:48 pm »
 To be honest Jet you may be right. At the time I was too young to remember.
The incident happened only after a week from when we had moved in. My family were told to get out the village. The people who told them to get out, lived round the corner. So, I doubt we were a problem to them. To be honest we had just a fair a course as they did to live here as my Grandpa owned the first shop in the village. Well now I can say I've cemented myself in the village history books and so if I decide to move away and then come back here in the future, I won't be expecting any fuss from my neighbours.
So Jet, this incident may have been brung upon by my family, but then there is a thing called being democratic. This allows people to talk and then come up with an idea which will satisfy both parties, but in this case my family didn't really get given a choice or a reason for their newly formed enemies. I don't believe some of the comments recieved by new comers in the village, that I've heard in this thread, really are acceptable behaviour. Surely if you have a problem then both parties can be man enough to come together and solve the problem.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2002, 11:21:08 pm by Mooniemad »
 

John_fraser

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #54 on: July 03, 2002, 11:22:41 pm »
The point Mooniemad about how the village has changed was so on the nail that I want to reiterate it. This village is a living entity. You may try to preserve its character, but it will continue to evolve and change. You may not like all of the changes, but longing for the BP of 1985 is as pointless as longing for the BP of 1885 – or indeed your lost youth.

I’m not arguing for unchecked development, but if we confuse the building of houses on greenbelt land with extending properties we will not just lose the plot. The dangers JET sees of losing the green spaces are very real, and in my opinion unrequired - the UK is not as over crowded as some vested interests like to make out. To object to every development will weaken the arguments against the real problems.

I do think it is a little unfair to blame this government for the cost of moving. While I’d be happy to lay the blame for many things at their door, there are now only two breaks on the housing bubble – stamp duty and interest rates. All bubbles burst and when this one goes it will hurt a lot of people. Even higher stamp duty now may save us the pain of higher interest rates and repossessions latter.

Just to stir things up, there is a cheaper side to BP. And I feel I can say that because I live in it. However, it doesn’t matter because:
1) I couldn’t afford to buy my house if it was on the market today
2) I like my house and it is a lot better than I ever expected to live in
3) I have the best neighbours on the planet
4) I like the whole of BP  
Basically you can live in Hadleywood and hate it or Tottenham and love it. Its not the cost of the house that matters.
 

Offline anna

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #55 on: July 03, 2002, 11:44:48 pm »
Astra, I ask you please not to make this a personal debate. No, I would never consider block paving. Yes we have had to remove a tree that was rotten, and I even kept some of the good logs to enhance the natural look of my garden and spent money planting what will be another beautiful tree in many years to come.  Yes we are going to have an extension, because I have a large family and its impossable to find a house big enough. We have spent a lot of time planning our extension to make sure we do not use extra land! We also turned down an offer by developers soon after we moved. (and a very nice sum the offer was too.) I fell in love with this house, there is no way I would ruin it.

I have also been a member of the greenbelt society for 7 years.  

I really don't see why this has become so personal, when we are talking about larger issues. I hope at least Astra you will no understand that I am in fact on the same side as you and Jet, and do not want to change the look of the village. NO I was not here 20 years ago, but I fell in love with what it is NOW! And I would fight to keep its beauty.

 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #56 on: July 04, 2002, 12:10:56 am »
Hey, a thought just entered my head (scary, eh?) - if everybody is desperate to move out of BP having sold their place for (say) between 500k-750k, where are they moving to?

Is there really anywhere else nicer than BP (even with the skips.........)? ;)

ATG
« Last Edit: July 04, 2002, 12:14:05 am by Alfred_the_Great »
Confucius he say "a dog is for life not just for Christmas Dinner"
 

Offline jet

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #57 on: July 04, 2002, 01:28:32 am »
Dear Alf.
There is no where comparable in the South East. I have looked. Which is why I moved within the village, I would have been happy in the cheap end for life if it had not been for rotten neighbours.
Houses here are in fact undervalued in my opinion.
My plans are hopefully Southern Ireland. Basically what I have here for quarter the price. No rates!!!!. All the field sports you could want for free and seas with fish in them still. A thriving EU sponsered economy, which we are paying for, Plus little chance of sunburn for my bald head .
Hope this helps.
regards,
jet
 

Offline MC

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #58 on: July 04, 2002, 02:26:37 am »
I see we are all strenuously agreeing with one another again.

Or at least close enough that it makes no difference.

Shall we move on?
 

Offline jet

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Re: Housing, planning, and development in North Mymms
« Reply #59 on: July 04, 2002, 03:04:20 am »
Definitly not its only just starting to be fun.
regards,
jet
 

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