Author Topic: TB Hospital  (Read 5436 times)

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Offline ABrownsdon

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TB Hospital
« on: December 30, 2005, 09:56:13 pm »
I am currently researching my family history. I have information about an aunt of mine, a Beatrice May Fryer-Kelsey spending time in a hospital/sanatorium suffering from TB in the early 1940`s.  I have been told that the hospital was in North Mimms but I can find no record of it. I would appreciate any help on tracking down where the hospital may be/have been and look forward to any response anyone can give.
 

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Re: TB Hospital
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2005, 07:09:18 am »
http://london-research-institute.co.uk/aboutlri/aboutch/historych?version=1

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ww2/A2081756

Will this start you off  ;)

Thanks Bob, the second link is very good. Here is a quote from it that might help ABrownsdon.

Quote

It was in May 1911, that Clare Hall Hospital treated patients with tuberculosis. It was used for treating advanced tuberculosis patients so there was an air of gloom and despondency about the place in 1935: 39% of the patients were discharged by death; with better investigation and treatment results were more cheerful and patients were happier. Although the known causation of the disease at this time had been isolated as Koch's Bacillus, it was still maintained by medical practitioners that one could not cure a fool of tuberculosis owing to the treatment being long and troublesome.

With the diminution of small-pox cases medical forces were directed against this more prevalent scourge and it took all the resources of the medical and nursing staff, both mental and physical, to forestall its ravages of the population.
USA Army Surgeon-General Bushnell's famous remark lies at the base of all treatment: "For tuberculosis we prescribe not medicine but a mode of life".

This is where Clare Hall Hospital and its nursing staff came into their own. As the disease was highly infectious the patients had to be isolated. Endless steadfastness, courage, self-discipline and self-denial were required of them. They were housed in a hutted sanatorium which was part of the Emergency Medical Service. The 'huts' were of brick construction with asbestos sheeted roofs. At the onset of the war it was adapted as a general hospital to meet the needs of the civilian casualties, acting as a base hospital receiving local and transferred air-raid casualties from London.

However, very soon the need for a special effort to combat tuberculosis under war conditions meant that all the beds were occupied with tuberculosis patients by December 1942, a total of 540 beds.

Surgical methods of radical character only began just before the war.

Susan McGinley worked throughout the war.There were several hundred nursing staff employed at the hospital during this time. Nurse McGinley tells me that at least half the nursing staff were from Ireland, 'from the four corners, as they say'; she herself enthuses that they indeed were a credit to their country. While others were fighting a mighty battle in Europe and in the desert sands of Africa and even further afield, she and her colleagues were fighting the furious tuberculosis disease, with no let up, in the sanatorium in South Mimms.

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Offline ABrownsdon

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Re: TB Hospital
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2005, 02:12:15 pm »
Bob

Thanks so much for the info re Clare Hall. I have now confirmed with other family members that this was in fact the place. Thankfully, my Aunt was one of the lucky ones who recovered and went on to live a long life.
Thanks again.
 

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Re: TB Hospital
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2005, 02:30:39 pm »
Andrea
Glad I could help  ;)
Bob
 

Offline chicken legs

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Re: TB Hospital
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2006, 11:02:52 pm »
I'd like to throw another idea into the ring.   I've lived in Welham Green (or North Mymms) for forty years this year.  I was with my brother the other day and we were talking about the fact that North Mymms House was a Red Cross Hospital during the war.  He suddenly dredged up from nowhere a memory that he had gone with our parents to visit an old family friend in hospital in North Mymms when he was a boy.  We think it would have been late 1940's.  Goodness knows why my address had never trigered this memory before.

I just wonder if the Red Cross Hospital was used for TB patients after the war, as both my brother and Mr/Ms Brownsdon remember "North Mymms", and Clare Hall is not in North Mymms
 

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