Author Topic: Bird nest crime  (Read 3718 times)

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Offline Editor

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Bird nest crime
« on: April 18, 2005, 05:29:03 pm »
Herts constabulary says anyone cutting back hedges and disturbing bird nests could be committing a crime. They've emailed this site with a news release urging gardeners and farmers not to break the law. The news release is reproduced below.

POLICE OFFER ADVICE FOR GARDENERS
By Susie ODea



WITH the onset of Spring police are urging gardeners to be cautious when cutting back hedges as you could be disturbing birds nests.

Over the last few weeks there have been a number of incidents in which people have inadvertently committed offences under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

It is an offence under the act to intentionally take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is in use or being built. It will be construed as an intentional act if, for example somebody continued to reduce or remove a hedgerow, tree or shrub, after they have been told that birds are nesting there.

The discovery of a nest during the process of work prohibits further cutting work within an area or buffer zone around the nest.

Police Wildlife Liaison Officer PC Nik Pringle said: “If you come across a nest during the breeding season you should stop work around the nest and wait until the very end of the possible breeding season.

“The RSPB advise that work on trees, shrubs and hedges should be limited during the period mid March to early August, while removing a hedge entirely should be avoided completely.

Additionally it is also an offence to disturb any wild bird whilst it is on a nest or to take any eggs, young or nests.”

Anyone convicted of such an offence could face a fine or imprisonment.

Nik added: “If you need advice on what can & can’t be done please contact a Police Wildlife Liaison Officer through your local police station. If you find a nest abandoned, further advice can be sought from the Natural History Museum at Tring.”
 
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Offline tigger

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Re: Bird nest crime
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2005, 09:09:22 pm »
Mr Editor, tell me this press release was issued on the first and you've been sitting on it for two weeks?

Whilst I fully understand that birds nests should not be disturbed, do I really need to be paying someone with my taxes to spend time writing a press release about it

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Re: Bird nest crime
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2005, 10:03:19 pm »
Dear Tigger,

The email came through today and was dated with today's date. The information was new to me and that is why I chose to post it. Here is a picture of a local hedge taken last year. It might help illustrate the problem birds face after the hedgerow has been severely trimmed. It doesn't leave them with much protection. We get half a dozen police emails a day about assorted crime in the district. We take care to publish only those that affect local residents. This seemed to be an important issue and certainly not a joke.

« Last Edit: April 21, 2005, 02:16:16 pm by Editor »
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Offline john

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Re: Bird nest crime
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2005, 11:58:21 am »
I see the material on the site has now been modified:  since the press release was aimed at gardeners rather than farmers, are you going to include a slightly more relevant photo perhaps ?    I might've been able to help you but for the fact that for example certain hedges etc which we used to have between us and some adjacent housing have disappeared   -   presumably to give the householders a longer view
Most (but not all) family-scale farmers have always done more than their level best to look after their estates but the expectations seem to change constantly.   Perhaps this is an opportunity for us all to find out (rather than just rehearse partial preferences) a few more practical things ?     -  like:
~   if the 1805 county survey referred to the traditions of hedging as being the need for them to be managed through radical cutting ... "replanting every 15 years ...  using them as the collieries of the countryside  " (by hand, in the winter, on starvation wages, ...)  -  how would people view/ react to that approach nowadays ?
~   if (i) as most plants mature, their bulk comes to the top so that any pruning, cutting, etc looks radical particularly in winter (as when one prunes ones roses), and  (ii) as summer arrives, the rabbits (of which there are more than enough hereabouts) are delighted to feast on the groundlevel fresh shoots and thus prevent  regeneration   -   so what would peoples' priority be ?   rabbits or new shoots ?
~   if farming costs continue to rise and incomes fall, how precisely does one make ends meet (without using the tractor-mounted kit that becomes a necessity rather than an option) ?

perhaps I should hasten to say that these are just a few of my own most immediate thoughts !

bw  - j
 

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Re: Bird nest crime
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2005, 03:57:40 pm »

I see the material on the site has now been modified: since the press release was aimed at gardeners rather than farmers, are you going to include a slightly more relevant photo perhaps?


Yes John, the post was edited in order to remove the location of the hedge and protect the identity of the landowner. The picture was taken in February last year but the advice is for the nesting season, so it would be unfair to suggest by association that the hedge had been cut during this period, which, according to the police news release, is from March onwards...

Quote

“The RSPB advise that work on trees, shrubs and hedges should be limited during the period mid March to early August, while removing a hedge entirely should be avoided completely."


It was never claimed that the image was relevant to the news release. It is just there to illustrate how hedges have been cut back in the past.

David
« Last Edit: April 22, 2005, 04:14:43 pm by Editor »
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

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