Author Topic: sick bunnies on footpath  (Read 3594 times)

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jrhutch

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sick bunnies on footpath
« on: September 14, 2004, 08:51:05 pm »
Hi, today I've seen 3 adult rabbits on the footpath near Br Park Station, and all were very ill -- blind (maybe with eyes gone??), weeping eyes, skinny...   not good; clearly almost dead. Haven't seen many normal rabbits around that area for a while, and found 1 dead one a few weeks ago.

Does anyone know if someone has been poisoning my bunny friends, or if there's a disease outbreak?
 

strata

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Re: sick bunnies on footpath
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2004, 09:05:52 pm »
Could be Myxomatosis. Some of the symptoms include sleepy eyes and blindness.

http://www.rguppy.freeserve.co.uk/myxomatosis%20fact%20sheet.htm
 

perry

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Re: sick bunnies on footpath
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2004, 09:54:19 am »
Try cooking them in a red wine sauce in a slow cooker. If they are chewy after about 8 hours then they are definitly diseased. Don't swallow.
 

jrhutch

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Re: sick bunnies on footpath
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2004, 01:00:34 pm »
Quote
Could be Myxomatosis. Some of the symptoms include sleepy eyes and blindness.

http://www.rguppy.freeserve.co.uk/myxomatosis%20fact%20sheet.htm


Sounds like a dead ringer, thanks.  Poor wittle bunnies.
 

Offline eric

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Re: sick bunnies on footpath
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2004, 08:29:52 pm »
still leaves thousands of the little devils munching and burrowing away and turning the path south of the station in to a major hazard
 

Offline CarolineB

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Re: sick bunnies on footpath
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2005, 01:42:16 pm »
Below is some more information on myxomatosis. Owners of pet rabbits may want to check with their vet about ways to prevent their rabbits from getting infected. As regards the footpath - it might be a good idea to check with the council about having this area cleared. Removing dead rabbits will reduce infection pressure to other rabbits and be of general health benefit. There is not much else we can do for affected wild rabbits, but with time the wild rabbit populations will acquire natural resistance to the virus and do not die, although they still carry the virus and act as a reservoir of infection for pet rabbits.  

Caroline

Myxomatosis is a viral disease that is well established in the wild rabbit population of many countries, and as a result it is transmitted from time to time to pet rabbits. Myxomatosis is spread by rabbit fleas and mosquitoes, and is highly infectious. Affected rabbits become quickly ill, with signs of lethargy, swelling of the eyelids and a watery discharge from the eyes. Within a day or so, these swellings can become so severe as to cause blindness, which makes feeding and drinking difficult. At this stage many rabbits become prey to animals such as foxes, but the common cause of death is a secondary lung infection. Not all affected rabbit’s die, although recovery in the wild is less common than in pet rabbits.
Occurrence of myxomatosis in wild rabbits means that pet rabbits are at risk. Ways to preventing them to become infected include preventing contact, flea control and vaccination.

Caroline
 

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