Author Topic: Motorised scooter warning  (Read 4950 times)

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Offline Editor

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Motorised scooter warning
« on: July 26, 2004, 04:42:56 pm »
Police are clamping down on the use of motorised scooters on local roads. They say motorised scooters come under the same vehicle class as mopeds. Police have called on parents not to let their children use the vehicles unless they have a valid licence, MOT, insurance, tax, and are wearing a crash helmet. Failure to do so will result in a £600 fine and six points on any future licence.  Click here for more details.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2004, 10:14:32 am by admin »
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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2004, 10:17:32 am »
The lawyers for the makers of the Go-Ped motorised scooter, Patmont Motor Werks, Inc., has e-mailed this site asking for references to the trademark name 'Go-Ped' not to be used as a generic term for describing motorised scooters.

The name was used because that is how Hertfordshire police referred to the motorised scooters in the e-mail sent to this site.

The name 'Go-Ped has now been removed from the item on the site and the term 'motorised scooter' used instead.

Go-Peds are just one brand of motorised scooters on the market.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2004, 11:48:27 am by admin »
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Offline Bad_Faerie

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2005, 05:28:59 pm »
I know this is an old post but I have one of these scooters, and until this issue flagged up I found it really useful for when I come back late at night after work. The last thing I want to do is walk half an hour in the dark all alone, it is very frightening so I used to use my scooter, which was electric, stand up one, to go along the public footpaths it got me home a bit faster and I felt safer as I felt it could get away from any trouble. It didn't go very fast as it had me a 14 stone 22yr old on it and if anyone was wandering around I would get off or go very, very slow around them... now my beloved scooter is left alone in my house as I am afraid to use it. I do not drive  but it looks like I either have walk home in the dark afraid or look for another job...I feel very sad, I wish public transport would run later.
Is it true that to use my scooter I need to have a full driving licence, scooter MOT and be insured to used it (bearing in mind it is electric, no seat and no lights) and if so does anyone know how to go about getting and MOT & Insurance for an electric scooter? Thanks.
 

Offline supersonic

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2005, 07:37:40 pm »
......does anyone know how to go about getting and MOT & Insurance for an electric scooter? Thanks.

Hi Bad_Faerie, it occurs to me that a good option for accurate and reliable data might be to contact Herts Police, will the links from Editor's earlier posts take you to contacts for them?  If not perhaps it might be worth you making a quick call to the new community bobby to see if he can offer any information and/or guidance?

Good luck with your quest.


supersonic
 

Offline Mooniemad

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2005, 10:09:42 pm »
Am I correct in stating that there is a law saying cycle bikes are not for cycling on paths? *Curious*
 

Offline Bad_Faerie

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2005, 12:26:05 pm »
That is true and for a very good reason! :)

I forgot to say the route I took is a foot & cycle path– sorry.

Also a bike is very much bigger than my little electric scooter and I think it would be dangerous if it was used it on the road because it is so small and you have to push it up even the smallest incline.

Thanks for the advice supersonic.
 

Offline Mallow

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2005, 12:43:55 pm »
The Motor Vehicle (Contruction & Use) Regulations 1986 required other road legal vehicles to have lights, indicators and a hooter (for example trail bike/quad bike) I wonder is this applied also to a motorised scooter. 

These guys reckon on a motorcycle helmet too.
http://www.rospa.com/roadsafety/advice/general/motorised_scooters.htm
 ???
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Offline Govvy

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2005, 06:15:39 pm »
There are some kids near us that go up and down Pine Grove on those scooters, they have the most anoying sound and the way they go round the dirt track sooner or later someone is going to have an accident!

I do beleive that it is a lot cheaper on road tax and insurance for none petral scooters and that you can save more on your money with a low powered scooter than getting a car. I think it has to be under 90CC.
 

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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2005, 11:51:50 am »
Hertfordshire Constabularly has just sent this site this news release.


July 12, 2005

POLICE SUMMER HOLIDAY WARNING ON MOTORISED SCOOTERS
By Corporate Communication Dept


POLICE are issuing a warning to parents and youths about the purchase and use of motorised scooters and mini motos as the school summer holidays get underway.

Motorised scooters, also known as mini motos, buzz-boards and go-peds are actually sold as not being suitable for use on the road.

The vehicles are all fitted with a mechanical engine and some models are capable of speeds up to 40mph. As a result of the design and specification many parents and young people are unaware of either the dangers or the road traffic offences that may be committed.

The High Court has deemed that if such a vehicle is used on the road it is classed as a mechanically propelled vehicle under Section 185 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. Therefore, before it can be used on the road, a motorised scooter must be registered with the DVLA as a moped and the rider must comply with the regulations set out for moped riders.

This means the rider must be aged 16 or over and they must hold a relevant driving licence. If they hold a provisional licence L-plates must be displayed and they must have taken their Compulsory Basic Training. Riders must also wear crash helmets and the vehicle must be insured, taxed, hold a MOT certificate and display a number plate.

Chief Inspector Nigel Brown said: “These vehicles are very popular with youths in the county. However the problem is that many of the people who buy these motorised scooters are unaware of the legislation concerning their use.

"The High Court has classed motorised scooters in the same category as mopeds, meaning everyone using them must comply with the same legislation and conditions as moped riders.

“We have a number of concerns about these vehicles. Firstly we are concerned for the safety of children riding these scooters and the danger posed to others, especially pedestrians.

“Our other major concern is the anti social behaviour problems associated with these vehicles. On average we receive around 20 calls a day from concerned residents in the county reporting these vehicles being driven in local roads, footpaths, parks and woodlands.”

To increase the public’s awareness a new poster, titled ‘Don’t lose your wheels’, has been designed and is being distributed across the county. The poster highlights the consequences riders of these vehicles face if they are caught. It also covers all the areas in which these vehicles cannot be ridden and goes through all the necessary documentation needed to ride these vehicles on the road.

Over the summer months police will be targeting the riders of these vehicles. The drive will see officers enforcing the law and educating parents, youths and retail outlets about the laws surrounding these vehicles.

Nigel added: “We have a variety of methods that we can use to catch and deter people from riding these vehicles. We can seize any vehicle that is being used anti-socially and we can also look into getting an anti-social behaviour order on the rider or prosecute them for various traffic offences.

“Being able to seize these bikes is a valuable tool which we will not hesitate to use in a robust manner, to protect the quality of life and safety of residents in Hertfordshire.”

The powers result from the 2002 Police Reform Act and mean that, following an initial warning, a vehicle can be seized if it continues to be used anti-socially. People will initially be given a verbal and written warning and if they continue to use the vehicle in an anti-social manner in the following twelve months the vehicle will be seized. The owner of the seized vehicle will be required to pay a minimum fee of £105 plus a £12 / day storage charge to recover their vehicle and will not be allowed to drive it away until they prove ownership and supply full MOT, insurance and tax details.

People found riding these vehicles without valid insurance are liable to receive a 6-point penalty along with a typical fine of £600. Drivers who have not yet qualified for a full driving licence will have these penalty points endorsed upon one later attained in life.

Nigel ended by saying: “We are not trying to ruin anyone’s fun – we want to stop the use of these bikes before someone is seriously injured or even killed. If you are thinking about buying one of these vehicles or currently ride one please think again.”


 
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Re: Motorised scooter warning
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2005, 06:28:15 am »
The latest Neighbourhood Watch Newsletter raises the issue of motorised scooter. Here is the extract. The newsletter can be read in full by clicking here.

Quote

Motorised scooter or buzzboard - a fast answer

Can I ride a motorised scooter or buzzboard on the road?


When ridden on a public road, these vehicles are regarded as a "motor vehicle" for the purposes of the Section 185(1) of the Road Traffic Act 1988.

The legal age to drive this type of vehicle is the same as for a moped, with the rider required to have a provisional licence and have taken the CBT (Compulsory Basic Training) test. Riders must also be wearing an approved crash helmet, have the vehicle taxed, with a valid MOT certificate, valid insurance, proper number plates, brakes, lights and indicator signals.

Remember: the term "road" includes not only a carriageway but also pavements and verges and also any highway, which encompasses footpaths, bridleways and by-ways. It can also include privately-owned roads to which the public have access and has in some cases included car parks.

Christel Anslow

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