Author Topic: The lost trackway  (Read 3415 times)

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Offline Mike Burgess

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The lost trackway
« on: April 29, 2013, 09:35:57 pm »
I wonder if anyone here has ever heard of the Puddingstone Track?

In 1949 Dr Ernest Rudge (later to be principal of West Ham Technical College) reckoned to have discovered a Neolithic trackway from Grimes Graves (ancient flint mines in Norfolk) to Stonehenge, marked at intervals by puddingstone boulders. He spent the next 25 years following the track and discovering more and more stones. It's supposed to enter Herts at Cheshunt and head roughly westwards through Newgate Street and Wildhill, before passing a boulder in Millward's Park. Then come Bullen's Green, Colney Heath and Tyttenhanger, and a line of nine stones going through St. Albans.

I'm particularly interested in the Bullen's Green and Colney Heath stones, as I've been investigating this alleged trackway for many months now. Dr Rudge never actually saw either of these himself, as they were either buried or lost, but was told about them by locals. The first he described as being once beside the road, but by 1950 had been buried in the foundations of No 27 Bullen's Green Row. However, the map reference he gives is TL214060, which would put it round about No 57 or 59 Bullen's Green Lane. Now, I've searched through maps back to the 1870's, and can't find any trace of this Row.  Can anyone help?

The second stone I'm trying to track down was supposed to have been at TL197062, by the roadside near Colney Heath church, and disappeared after road alterations. The site was later covered by a bus shelter. If anyone has any information about, or old photographs of, either of these, I'd be grateful to hear about it - or indeed any other puddingstone boulders that might be in the area.
 

Offline Local Walker

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Re: The lost trackway
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2013, 08:55:43 pm »
Hello Mike

On the outskirts of St Albans is an area called Highfield, which was built on the site of Highfield Hospital. Connected with the history of Highfield is a puddingstone which I think is related to Tyttenhanger, which is also nearby. The stone is located outside the offices of the Highfield Park Trust who also know about it.

http://www.highfieldparktrust.co.uk/index.php/puddingstone-mainmenu-102

To get there from the London Colney direction, at the roundabout with the village and the A414 take the A1087 London Road heading towards St Albans. At the first roundabout near the fire station turn right onto Highfield Park Drive. At the next roundabout turn left onto Nightingale Lane and at the next t-junction turn right. Soon an entrance for Highfield Park will appear on the right.

Alternatively, on the A1087 go past the fire station and at the traffic lights turn right onto Drakes Drive. Ignore the first mini roundabout and then take the second road on the right called Froshiber Road and Highfield Park is opposite.

 

Online sasquartch

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Re: The lost trackway
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2013, 09:34:12 pm »
To get there from the London Colney direction, at the roundabout with the village and the A414 take the A1087 London Road heading towards St Albans

Actually the A1081.
 

Offline Local Walker

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Re: The lost trackway
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2013, 09:47:20 pm »
Thanks, I'm not sure how I mucked that up. I've lived here for years
 

Offline Mike Burgess

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Re: The lost trackway
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2013, 02:07:27 pm »
Local Walker, hi, and thanks for the response.

Yes, I did know about the Highfield Park stone. It used to be in the kitchen gardens of Cell Barnes Hospital, and was one of those on Rudge's trackway. He described others at Tyttenhanger near the old Barley Mow pub, near the gate of Hillend Farm, and one known locally as The Block in Highfield Lane, which had disappeared by 1920.

I have to conclude from the large number of views, but few responses, that no one has heard of Bullen's Green Row, or knows of a puddingstone in Colney Heath. Nevertheless, thanks to everyone who has viewed this thread.  :)
 

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