Author Topic: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?  (Read 15389 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Editor

  • David Brewer
  • Administrator
  • Opinions on everything
  • *****
  • Posts: 8930
  • Thanked: 144 times
  • Gender: Male
    • Media Helping Media
  • Expertises:
  • Walking
  • Real ale
Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« on: December 15, 2012, 02:52:42 am »
From the BBC - a Q & A.

What is fracking and why is it controversial?

Quote
The government has given the go-ahead to the controversial technique known as "fracking". Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock. But what benefits could it bring? And should we be concerned?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14432401

The Guardian asks is the UK right to go ahead?

Fracking: is the UK right to go ahead?

Quote
The widely expected move comes amid a fierce debate in the UK about the merits and dangers of fracking. Some say it is safe and will lead to cheaper energy. Others say it presents too many environmental hazards and is unlikely to force down gas prices, as it has done in the US.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2012/dec/13/fracking-shale-gas-uk-davey
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2012, 08:55:35 am »
Yes

http://www.nohotair.co.uk/

Fracking is not new, it's been happening for decades. Thousands upon thousands of wells have been fracked in the US, for instance. If there was an intrinsic problem with fracking, the lawyers would have sued the drillers into ruination. As it is, it's brought gas prices tumbling there and brought more jobs. By replacing coal generation it's also led to reduced CO2 emissions if you care about that sort of thing.

Germany has just voted to allow fracking to continue.

The BBC routinely describes fracking as "controversial". (My opinions of general news bias at the BBC aren't suitable for a family-friendly forum.) I don't think they do this about nuclear, for instance. Why not?
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2012, 10:50:01 am »
The BBC aren't the only ones who think there's more to the Fracking business than the industry claims (reminds me of incineration - they claim incinerators are now safe unlike the earlier plants that released Dioxins. Although, I haven't found any warnings from either the industry or the authorities that there was a hazard when they were spewing out Dioxins. Also, we've seen how many decades and ruined lives it took before they could successfully sue the tobacco industry - even when their own research showed their products were harmful. Bet they said Fukushima couldn't happen either.):


The Fuss Over Fracking: The Dilemma of a New Gas Boom
http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,876880045001_2062814,00.html

[If nothing else check out the explosive water supply at the 03:20 point]
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2012, 11:32:13 am »
Since the video was made (back in 2010?), I think the US EPA has announced that it has found no cases of undrinkable water in Pennsylvania. None.

Flaming faucets used to happen in Pennsylvania before any fracking.

Bear in mind that:

1. Regulatory standards continue to tighten

2. Any problems seem isolated. Remember there are thousands upon thousands of fracked wells in the US. Wells have been fracked for decades elsewhere.

Fracking is not new technology.
 

Offline epiphany

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 710
  • Thanked: 80 times
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2012, 01:20:38 pm »

Flaming faucets



Sounds like one of Robins lines from Batman......
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2012, 02:20:57 pm »
We know that the 'solid' ground that we live on is in reality part of a tectonic plate floating on magma. And that these plates are constantly in motion leading to constant stresses and strains which periodically manifest themselves through earthquakes and volcanic activity. Actively using a process which effectively weakens the ground we live on in this small island doesn't seem sensible to me.

How fracking caused earthquakes in the UK - 17:45 02 November 2011

"A magnitude-2.3 earthquake occurred on 1 April, followed by a magnitude-1.5 quake on 27 May. Both occurred close to the Preese Hall drilling site, where Cuadrilla Resources was using fracking to extract gas from a shale bed.

Initial studies by the British Geological Survey (BGS) suggested that the quakes were linked to Cuadrilla's fracking activities. The epicentre of the second quake was within 500 metres of the drilling site, at a depth of 2 kilometres. Less information was available on the first quake, but it seems to have been similar.

The link with fracking has now been confirmed by an independent report commissioned by Cuadrilla, Geomechanical Study of Bowland Shale Seismicity, which states: "Most likely, the repeated seismicity was induced by direct injection of fluid into the fault zone."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21120-how-fracking-caused-earthquakes-in-the-uk.html
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2012, 02:25:46 pm »
Tiny tremors like that happen all the time.
 

Offline Editor

  • David Brewer
  • Administrator
  • Opinions on everything
  • *****
  • Posts: 8930
  • Thanked: 144 times
  • Gender: Male
    • Media Helping Media
  • Expertises:
  • Walking
  • Real ale
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2012, 02:57:13 pm »
Tiny tremors like that happen all the time.

Does that justify creating more risk of earthquakes through fracking?
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 


Offline Editor

  • David Brewer
  • Administrator
  • Opinions on everything
  • *****
  • Posts: 8930
  • Thanked: 144 times
  • Gender: Male
    • Media Helping Media
  • Expertises:
  • Walking
  • Real ale
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2012, 03:11:29 pm »
So fracking was the cause of the earthquake, confirming cause for concern.
The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2012, 03:18:52 pm »
Cuadrilla admitted as much pretty fast. Mining produces tremors, heavy vehicles going past a house produce tremors. There's more of it going on than we think.

I know it's not what you asked, but today's FT talks about the economic benefits of shale gas for the US.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/4b3f6280-4609-11e2-ae8d-00144feabdc0.html

These two tremors were small and the consensus seems to be they're unlikely to be repeated. In any case the UK controls will be extremely tight:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/14/gaia_violated_by_frackers/
 

Offline Ex Libris

  • Opinions on some things
  • **
  • Posts: 82
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Gender: Female
  • Forum Member
  • Expertises:
  • Research
  • Boules (pétanque)
  • Teaching
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2012, 08:07:53 pm »
The process uses a great deal of water and that should be a cause for concern especially in areas which are susceptible to water supply shortage, for example the South East of England.

Friends of the Earth has produced a number of Briefings on shale gas and fracking.  These two may be of interest - http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/briefings/fracking_10_questions.pdf and http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/briefings/shale_gas.pdf

In any case the UK controls will be extremely tight:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/14/gaia_violated_by_frackers/

Beyond the controls mentioned in the article, what other controls are in place? 

Environmental Impact Assessments are required currently only on sites covering over one hectare.  It has been reported that Cuadrilla has got round this by using sites that cover an area of 0.99 hectares or less.
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2012, 08:40:52 pm »
How much is "a great deal of" water in relation to other industrial and extractive processes?

No one is claiming fracking is completely issue free. There's a trade off. The cheaper gas brought about in the US by fracking is not only making consumers directly better off, it's also led to more jobs and arguably kickstarted an economic revival.

There are downsides to every industrial process. Mining? Factories? Railways? Would we have opposed all those? Friends of the Earth and their ilk would surely have campaigned against all of them.

The US won't be the only country fracking its shale and benefiting from cheaper energy. If we don't want more UK gas, what is the alternative?

It's a trade off. The environmental risks can be contained. The economic rewards for the country could be big.
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2012, 09:53:09 pm »
Cuadrilla admitted as much pretty fast...These two tremors were small and the consensus seems to be they're unlikely to be repeated.

From my earlier quote from the New Scientist:

Initial studies by the British Geological Survey (BGS) suggested that the quakes were linked to Cuadrilla's fracking activities. The epicentre of the second quake was within 500 metres of the drilling site, at a depth of 2 kilometres. Less information was available on the first quake, but it seems to have been similar.

The link with fracking has now been confirmed by an independent report commissioned by Cuadrilla, Geomechanical Study of Bowland Shale Seismicity, which states: "Most likely, the repeated seismicity was induced by direct injection of fluid into the fault zone."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21120-how-fracking-caused-earthquakes-in-the-uk.html

It sounds to me more like they were found out. I'm also sceptical as to how anyone can be so confident that it won't happen again (especially if they are directly injecting into fault zones).

We are lucky in having relatively view major seismic events in this country. Whether we continue to do so after playing a massive game of Jenga across the country is left to be seen. However, IF the more pessimistic forecasts are proved to be correct will it be possible to restore the status quo? And how much would it cost?

In short, like Fukushima any benefits MAY prove to be short term but a long term national economic disaster.

While you're right in that most things in life involve a trade off or as economists say an 'opportunity cost', would you be willing to see your home damaged / destroyed or otherwise devalued; your (and your friends' and family's) health and lives endangered?

Fracking has more leeway in the wide open spaces of the US, Canada and Australia but on this crowded little island it makes sense to err on the side of caution. Because like Bhopal, Chernobyl and all the other major industrial disasters it'll be the taxpayers who end up footing the bill if things go radically pear-shaped.


"The UK is not generally associated with earthquakes, however, between 20 to 30 earthquakes are felt by people each year, and a few hundred smaller ones are recorded by sensitive instruments.

Most of these are very small and cause no damage.

However, some British earthquakes have caused considerable damage, although nothing like the devastation caused by large earthquakes in other parts of the world...The largest known British earthquake occurred near the Dogger Bank in 1931, with a magnitude of 6.1.

Fortunately, it was 60 miles offshore but was still powerful enough to cause minor damage to buildings on the east coast of England.

The most damaging UK earthquake was in the Colchester area in 1884. Some 1200 buildings needed repairs, chimneys collapsed and walls were cracked.

...A magnitude 4 earthquake happens in Britain roughly every two years. We experience a magnitude 5 roughly every 10–20 years."

http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/hazards/earthquakes/UK.html

 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2012, 03:31:30 pm »
Quote
Exploiting shale gas is safe, according to the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering. Fracking of one kind or another has been used here for decades; the earthquakes it causes are no worse than a bus going past; it does not use much water compared with other industries; it’s not responsible for flammable tap water; and methane leakage is not as bad as has been claimed. Nor, with a mile of rock between the fractures and the aquifers, does it cause groundwater contamination. Last year there were 125,000 fracs in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, no frac has ever contaminated groundwater.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/9721493/Lets-get-fracking-and-slash-our-gas-bills.html

Quote
In the UK, at least, hard facts over fracking continue to undermine the trumped up charges levelled by the anti-frackers at every turn of the drill bit. And it is worth reviewing the arguments affecting the issue in the UK to see precisely why minor seismic events are failing to register as significant with the British Government when it comes to hydraulic fracturing.

The British Geological Survey (BGS) report, published in late October, on the two minor tremors near Blackpool on England’s north-west coast earlier this year they were almost certainly caused by Cuadrilla’s fracking operation just a few hundred meters from the epicenter of both micro-quakes. The first tremor on April 1 was a magnitude of 2.3 on the Richter Scale and the second, on May 27, 1.5. The BGS report highlighted both the rarity of such events over the past 60 years, and confirmed the small scale of the seismic activity.

In June, Cuadrilla suspended its drilling operation and commissioned its own investigation in conjunction with Keele University. In November, Cuadrilla Resources published its findings in a report that would also be submitted for independent peer review. The report concluded that the tremors had been caused by an “unusual combination of factors” that were “unlikely to occur again”.

Their report found that the specific geology of the well, as well as the pressure exerted by water injected directly into a tectonic fault two miles underground, meant the Preese Hall site was perhaps not the wisest choice. The study went on to state how the two tremors were of an order stronger than those usually associated with hydraulic fracking. Further, even if these factors were to combine again to cause an even stronger 3-magnitude quake that too would not be “expected to present a risk”.

Stefan Baisch, one of the authors of the Cuadrilla report, is also general manager of the German deep-drilling research firm Q-Con. He has a PhD in seismology and has spent 10 years researching induced seismicity. Baisch points out some hard facts about fracking that confirms Cuadrilla’s ‘worst-case scenario’ assessment. Referring to Cuadrilla’s operation, Basich states, “There have been more than a million similar treatments in the world over the last 50 years or so, and there are only two cases where similar seismic reactions occurred.”
http://www.thegwpf.org/fracking-a-quakes-not-a-whole-lotta-shakin-goin-on/

Experts tell us the risk is small and containable,  and there is a possibility of a big economic prize.
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2012, 04:44:10 pm »


Quote
Their report found that the specific geology of the well, as well as the pressure exerted by water injected directly into a tectonic fault two miles underground, meant the Preese Hall site was perhaps not the wisest choice.
http://www.thegwpf.org/fracking-a-quakes-not-a-whole-lotta-shakin-goin-on/

Experts tell us the risk is small and containable,  and there is a possibility of a big economic prize.

Hmm.."perhaps not the wisest choice", but they went ahead and fracked anyway.

As for expert opinions, it is a question of which ones you believe (plenty of 'expert' opinion saying there wasn't a health issue with cigarettes). Then there were claims that global warming was just a spurious scare story to justify raising taxes.

I also wonder exactly how independent / neutral and open minded the organisation you have quoted really are:

"The Global Warming Policy Foundation was launched by Lord Lawson and Dr Benny Peiser on 23 November 2009 in the House of Lords – in the run-up to the Copenhagen Climate Summit...We are in no sense ‘anti-environmental’. There is a wide range of important environmental issues, which call for an equally wide range of policy responses. Our concern is solely with the possible effects of any future global warming and the policy responses that may evoke. The GWPF is funded overwhelmingly by voluntary donations from a number of private individuals and charitable trusts. In order to make clear its complete independence, it does not accept gifts from either energy companies or anyone with a significant interest in an energy company."

http://www.thegwpf.org/who-we-are/
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2012, 04:47:56 pm »
Never believe any expert because some in unrelated fields have proved to be wrong in the past?
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2012, 09:09:10 am »
No, just don't blindly believe in what people claim. Clearly, there is a concerted effort to 'sell' fracking to the public. And that's not to say that we shouldn't carefully examine the pros and cons.

As we've seen before - with things like timeshares, endowment mortgages, investing in wine and other financial products - often what people rave enthusiastically about turns into the next mis-selling scandal. If something sounds too good to be true...


"The Observer has established that two key executives of the energy trading giant Vitol, whose boss has given more than £500,000 to the Conservatives, were personal shareholders in a company bringing "hydraulic fracturing", commonly known as fracking, and a related technology, coal bed methane (CBM) extraction, to the UK. But doubts are growing over whether such technologies can deliver the cheap energy prices the gas lobby claims...The previously unpublicised interests of two Vitol executives, Bob Finch, its head of trading, and Christopher Bake, managing director of Vitol, Dubai, in "unconventional gas extraction" assets suggests they believe it could be a major source of energy. Alan Duncan, the international development minister, worked for Vitol in the 1990s and was a consultant for another company part-owned by Vitol. Ian Taylor, its chief executive, who has donated around £550,000 to the Conservatives, was a guest at an intimate dinner party with David Cameron in his Downing Street flat last November. Weeks after the private dinner - for people who had donated more than £50,000 to the Tories - it emerged that Vitol had supplied oil to rebels in Libya. The revelation prompted suggestions the deal had been brokered by the Foreign Office, a claim comprehensively rejected by Vitol."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/oct/21/conservatives-links-fossil-fuel-lobbyists

[Bold text my emphasis]
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2012, 09:18:31 am »
Nothing is for certain. It's a trade-off. All we can say is that as supply of a good increases, its price tends to fall. We won't know how much gas can be extracted until Cuadrilla can do more tests.
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2013, 07:59:12 am »
"Scientists have linked the underground injection of oil-drilling wastewater to a magnitude-5.7 earthquake in 2011 that struck the US state of Oklahoma...The study in Geology suggests that "induced seismicity" can occur years after wastewater injection begins...The new study adds to an increasing body of evidence that the injection of wastewater is correlated to an increase in seismic events." -  27 March 2013 Last updated at 14:19
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21952428
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2013, 08:06:11 am »
See the correction at the end of the piece - nothing to do with fracking:

Quote
Correction 27 March 2013: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the wastewater injected was from hydraulic fracturing - in fact, the wastewater implicated was from conventional oil drilling.

Apparently they couldn't do that here: the EU Landfill Directive 1999 (transposed into domestic law by the Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2001 banned the disposal of liquids to landfill … this was extended to the disposal of liquid wastes down the well.
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2013, 08:31:03 am »
"What is fracking?
The process of hydraulic fracturing – or "fracking" – involves drilling a hole deep into the dense shale rocks that contain natural gas, then pumping in at very high pressure vast quantities of water mixed with sand and chemicals. This opens up tiny fissures in the rock, through which the trapped gas can then escape. It bubbles out and is captured in well that brings it to the surface, where it can be piped off."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/apr/20/shale-gas-fracking-question-answer

Even so, it seems to me that the mechanics of the process are similar - pumping in liquid and creating a pressure system.
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2013, 09:17:07 am »
How do the quantities compare? And how many wells have been drilled in the US over the last few years with no tremors detected?

This study - and some are saying the quakes may have been natural anyway - tells us nothing about fracking, I suggest.
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2013, 08:16:38 pm »
I've no idea. I also don't know how geologically similar we are with them.

However, I do know the US and Canada are an awful lot bigger than this little island and its honeycombed ground - the result of centuries of human activity like coal, tin and other mineral extraction (offshore oil and gas extraction may also have left a legacy of instability / weakness).

Fracking may be safe but we would do well to err on the side of caution - or get ready to reinvade the States or France if it all goes horribly wrong and we need somewhere new to live. :icon_jokercolor:

 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2013, 08:24:51 pm »
I didn't recall that old workings were an issue on Cuadrilla's patch - what's there?
 

Offline trekbat

  • Opinions on most things
  • ****
  • Posts: 719
  • Thanked: 18 times
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2013, 08:37:28 pm »
Nothing that I'm aware about but that doesn't necessarily mean there's nothing there - as people in Hatfield found out records weren't always kept even for activity in the last couple of centuries.

Also, even if they have no problems at the Caudrilla test site, it may be a different story elsewhere.

"Mine Stabilisation beneath Hatfiled [sic]"
http://www.bamritchies.co.uk/news/April09mine_stabilisation.html

"Abandoned and unstable chalk mines beneath Briars Lane in Hatfield have been gradually making their presence known for almost 30 years. But now a new project with a twofold approach is under way to stop future ground collapses." [curiously named author - probably a pseudonym]
http://www.bamritchies.co.uk/news/nov07_holey_war.html
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2013, 08:41:20 pm »
Obviously we can't have a policy that says we will never try to exploit a potentially huge shale resource anywhere in the UK in case there are old mine workings there we don't know of - which are likely to be far more shallow than the level where fracking would take place.
 

Offline Greybeard

  • Opinions on many things
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Gender: Male
  • Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2013, 02:08:22 pm »
Interesting account of a talk given on fracking including the information that fracking has been done over 200 times in the UK since the 1970s

http://frackland.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/my-visit-to-glastonbury.html?m=1

and the slides can be downloaded from http://www1.gly.bris.ac.uk/%7EJamesVerdon/PDFS/Glastonbury_talk.pdf
 

Offline Editor

  • David Brewer
  • Administrator
  • Opinions on everything
  • *****
  • Posts: 8930
  • Thanked: 144 times
  • Gender: Male
    • Media Helping Media
  • Expertises:
  • Walking
  • Real ale
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2014, 10:10:38 am »
It seems that this area has not been identified as either 1) an area covered by existing government licenses covering fracking or, 2) areas proposed for licensing by the government - although some fairly close surrounding areas have. You can use the map below to check your postal code for fracking, zoom in on an area, and click on the overlay options to find out more about the likely impact, if any, on this area or other areas of the UK. The map and information have been compiled by Friends of the Earth which continues to raise concern the impact on climate change.

The Brookmans Park Newsletter has been supporting the village and our local community since 1998 by providing free, interactive tools for all to use.
 

Offline sasquartch

  • Forum Moderator
  • Opinions on everything
  • *****
  • Posts: 1416
  • Thanked: 23 times
  • Brookmans Park Forum Member
Re: Fracking under local homes - are we safe?
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2014, 10:17:41 am »
I don't understand why it is automatically assumed that fracking is a bad thing.

Like it or not, we need gas (as well as other energy) and the alternative to producing it ourselves is relying on other countries to provide it, these are often politically unstable parts of the world with poor human rights records.

I would expect fracking in the UK would have all sorts of safety rules and regulations which may not be the case in other parts of the world.

We have extracted coal from the ground for centuries, is fracking fundamentally any different ?

 

Tags: