Author Topic: Paving your front garden  (Read 2867 times)

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Offline Albert Ross

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Paving your front garden
« on: November 20, 2008, 07:54:42 am »
From 1st October 2008 anybody thinking of paving or repaving their front garden should read the following Environment Agency leaflet:- http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/pavingfrontgardens.pdf. This only applies if your front slopes or discharges towards the road.
 

Offline Bob Horrocks

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Re: Paving your front garden
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2008, 10:55:48 am »
This only applies if your front slopes or discharges towards the road.

Hi Albert

I am not sure that your reading of this leaflet is correct.  My interpretation is that the new driveway should have a slope so that the rain drains off.

If you are in any doubt as to whether or not you need planning permission under the new policy, the best advice is that before you start work contact the planning department at Welwyn Hatfield Council on 01707 357000 and ask to speak to someone in that department.  I would not rely on what any contractors might say - they will want the least hassle.  The onus is on you.

Offline Albert Ross

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Re: Paving your front garden
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2008, 02:59:17 pm »
Bob

I think this bit is the main concern "Planning permission is now required to lay traditional impermeable
driveways that allow uncontrolled runoff of rainwater from front gardens onto roads,
because this can contribute to flooding and pollution of watercourses.
If a new driveway or parking area is constructed using permeable surfaces such as
permeable concrete block paving, porous asphalt or gravel, or if the water is otherwise
able to soak into the ground you will not require planning permission."


This means traditional type surfaces will require planning permission if it is larger than 5 Sq.m. If you use one of the new types of permeable surfaces or control the run off into a soakaway you will not require planning permission. I assume this will be policed as  with all planning issues. People should just be aware as I am sure many of the driveway installers will not be. The cost of the permeable material is quite a bit more expensive so watch out!
 

Offline Bob Horrocks

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Re: Paving your front garden
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2008, 11:01:07 am »
I assume this will be policed as  with all planning issues. 

Maybe I should not be saying this but.....

Except for Building Regulations, local authorities generally rely on Joe Public to keep them informed. 

The Green Belt Soc, Parish Council, and others perform this role as well as they can.  People do contact me to ask if I know about something or other, which I usually investigate or ask them to contact the council themselves. On this topic, someone drew my attention to an extensive driveway being built in Welham Green.  It transpired that work had started before 1st October so that was before this new regulation came into force.

Some people risk getting away with unauthorised work and others, like me, always seem to get found out if they cross over the line even by an inch.    :'(

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