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Author Topic: Local Nature  (Read 121506 times)

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Offline Mooniemad

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Local Nature
« on: July 01, 2002, 04:55:47 pm »
 I have noticed  that on many threads people are so determined to tell of their meetings with local nature, such as badgers and foxes. So, I thought this topic could be opened to allow people to trade their experiences of wonderful mother nature.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2010, 08:27:18 am by David Brewer »
 

Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2002, 11:59:05 pm »
I thought people might like to know there are some magnificent specimens of Turkey Oak on the eastern side of the Great North Road, just south of the junction with Kentish Lane and into the lane itself. One or two have blown down in recent years.

Don't know when KL was diverted to meet GNR at the present position (used to go down to the Shepherd's Way junction) but the trees must have been planted around then otherwise they would not follow the route so exactly. I estimate around 150-200 years old.


ATG
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Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2002, 12:01:52 am »
Nearly forgot, how about the Holm Oak beside the golf course road? You can see it (and the Wellingtonias at the end of the Drive) for miles around.
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Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2002, 12:19:01 am »
Discovered some more turkey oaks up Shepherds Way just before the gates to Queenswood.


ATG
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2002, 12:23:01 am »
Alfred, fancy writing a feature for the site about the different trees and we can add some pictures?  I had never heard of a 'Turkey Oak' until you posted.  I would like to know more.  I am sure others would too.  If you feel a feature coming on please mail it to forum@brookmans.com and it can be published on the site.  A bit like the local fungi and the local butterflies features.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2002, 12:31:44 am by admin »
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Offline anna

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2002, 06:15:42 am »
Can someone help?? Driving home the on Friday night, at about 1am..........As I pulled off Swanland Road, I saw the most beautiful bird, and I have no idea what it was.
It was larger than a swan, I think Grey in colour (it was very dark, so couldn't see clearly) it just stood in the middle of the road for awhile, and I just sat quietly and watched, it was such an elegant looking thing. I then got concerned it was just standing in the road, so I opened my door and it swooped away. I'd love to know what it was.....................anyone know?
 

MikeL

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2002, 04:37:35 pm »
Sounds like a Heron to me. It would be taller than a swan but not as heavy.
 

Offline anna

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2002, 11:12:23 pm »
thats what I thought Mike.........but I wasn't sure!

 

Offline jet

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2002, 11:38:05 pm »
Townie :P
Its tongue in cheek but its the nearest symbol.
If you want to see them in their natural habitat mail me and I will tell you where they nest.
regards,
jet
 

Offline Editor

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2002, 11:57:57 am »
Came across this in our garden.  Does anyone know whether it is a frog or a toad?  It didn't hop but waddled slowly across the lawn.  It walked like lizards walk.  And it was huge - about 5" long and 3" wide.  Didn't continued to walk across the lawn and into a hole under the shed.  What do these things eat to make them so big?

« Last Edit: July 13, 2002, 04:06:01 pm by admin »
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Offline Alfred the Great

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2002, 11:39:51 pm »
Looks like a common toad to me. In general, toads have very warty skin and frogs are smaller and tend to be much smoother. The markings and size appear to be of a common toad too. Also, frogs do tend to jump rather than waddle, and vice versa for toads, so this clinches it.

We don't get toads in our garden but lots of little frogs which the cats catch but don't eat - probably because they are cold and slimy.

ATG
« Last Edit: July 13, 2002, 11:41:11 pm by Alfred_the_Great »
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2002, 12:03:08 pm »
Two pages have been created showing the herbs and shrubs which were in flower during a short survey of Gobions on April 16 this year. 49 species were recorded and pictures of most are now included on the site. They are accessible from illustrated links on the right hand side of the front page if you want an easy way of getting to them in the future.

See also earlier studies.
fungi in Gobions
butterflies seen in Gobions in 1999
butterflies seen in Gobions in 1998
« Last Edit: August 19, 2002, 01:04:25 pm by admin »
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2002, 03:41:15 am »
A four-page survey of birds, seen in a 10 km area around Brookmans Park, has been published on the site.  It includes 100 colour plates and is based on the research carried out by Rupert Pyrah and published in one of the Gobions Woodland Trust's annual report. It might help people trying to identify birds they see in the area. When viewing the pages you can click on the thumbnail images of birds to reveal larger images. bird survey.
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2002, 11:27:46 pm »
Just seen a couple of bats flying around at the bottom of our garden in the fading light. They looked a bit like a small bird but the flight was faster and more erractic.  Is anyone an expert on bats?  What species are we likely to see here in Brookmans Park?

Update:  Someone has since messaged me suggesting it could be a Pipstrelle Bat, described here and here. I found out, from the second of these links that, if it is the Pipistrelle bat, it eats mosquitos and midges, which can't be a bad thing this time of the year. Here is an image on another site

« Last Edit: August 23, 2002, 09:11:18 am by admin »
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2002, 10:08:25 pm »
Just had about 40 Canada Geese fly over our house flying south east towards Gobions.  They do it quite frequently but I have never seen so many making such a row.  Does anyone know where the come from and where they go to each day and why?
« Last Edit: August 28, 2002, 10:11:22 pm by admin »
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Offline jet

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2002, 11:13:49 pm »
They go from the golf course, to the pond, depending on where they want to **** next, they naturally gather in larger flocks as September looms as instinct to migrate, they generraly stay around yhough as the climate and food is not that bad here.
regards,
jet

P.S. greenkeeper loves them :'(
 

Mary_Morgan

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2002, 11:57:59 pm »
It is not kids, it is the Canada geese that make a row now ;)

Hope they don't land, or the fox might get them :(
M
 

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2002, 12:48:31 pm »
Does anyone know why there are so many fields of what look like dead broad beans around the area?  They look as though they have been on fire but they haven't.  Have they been deliberately left to go off. The bean stalks are about four foot high and the pods have all gone brown and the beans inside are speckled with black spots.  And it is not just one field but dozens.  Is it a disease or some sort of crop rotation programme?
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Offline Mallow

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2002, 04:09:24 pm »
Dear Ed,

Not sure what it is but I asked the same question a couple of years ago.  A farming friend told me what it is but I can't remember, however it will be harvested and used for cattle fodder during the winter.  And yes, it is a form of crop rotation.

Regards,
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Offline Swan

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2002, 05:38:09 pm »
To change the tack slightly, is anyone aware of wild boar abroad in BP (I know there are some in Essex)

The reason that I ask is because, one night a couple of weeks ago I passed a large flattened lump in the road that appeared to be a pig

Although, being realistic it was probably just some poor hapless dear that had met a vehicle while it crossed the road
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2003, 12:00:52 am »
It is a good time of the year for spotting fungi in Gobions.  Does anyone know the scientific names of these?

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2003, 10:46:10 pm »
For those who might have missed a lovely frosty morning over Gobions today, here are some pictures of the Leach Fields, taken at 9am on Sunday, January 12.

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2003, 04:22:04 pm »
Can any ornithologists identify this bird. It has been sitting in my garden all afternoon and looks very tired, as if it has travelled a long way. Apologies for the poor quality images but I had to use telephoto to avoid disturbing the bird.  It has a blue/grey body and a brown cap. It is about the size of a Great Tit.  Could it be a female Blackcap?



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Offline jet

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2003, 05:02:49 pm »
The female black cap, has in fact got a brown cap. (sylvia atricapilla)
Or it could be a form of warbler ie the willow warbler (phylloscopus trochilus)
Mind you female  Erithacus rubecula, look a bit like that (work it out) :)
regards
jet
who has swallowed a Latin tome ;)
P.S. It would get more response if you posted, identify the 4WD :o 8)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2003, 05:11:21 pm by jet »
 

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2003, 09:31:15 pm »
I think you are right Jet, a female Blackcap, as shown at www.birdguides.com (I have linked to the picture here) is very similar.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2003, 09:31:43 pm by admin »
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2003, 08:15:28 pm »
Just had to move a very frisky grass snake off our patio and down to the shade at the bottom of the garden.

This one was only about 30 cm long, but they can grow up to 150cm (5 feet). One website I looked at said that grass snakes are completely harmless to humans, but if disturbed or handled can bite.
The Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust site has some more pictures.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2003, 08:20:18 pm by admin »
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2003, 07:23:05 pm »
Site user Gill Humphreys wanted to share a photograph she took of some scarlet cup fungus (Sarcoscypha coccinea) which she spotted in Gobions in March. The fungus is widely distributed in hardwood forests, and grows from rotting wood. Click here to see more images of fungus found in Gobions in this site's environment section.
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2004, 08:30:08 am »
Rupert Pyrah has published his latest survey of local birds and full details are now on this site.

Thanks to Rupert for making this research available to everyone through allowing this site to publish the data.

You can contact Rupert by using the site's internal messaging system if you see any birds not mentioned in his lists.
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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2004, 10:24:18 pm »
I was walking along Kentish Lane yesterday and noticed the body of a Muntjac deer at the side of the road. Would it be worth suggesting the county council erects signs warning motorists that deers could be crossing the road in this area?
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Offline trinity

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Re: Local Nature
« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2004, 01:03:17 am »
Quote
I was walking along Kentish Lane yesterday and noticed the body of a Muntjac deer at the side of the road. Would it be worth suggesting the county council erects signs warning motorists that deers could be crossing the road in this area?



This presupposes that the motorists would pay any attention. Until
they hit one, that is. They can do a fair bit of damage to a car.
 

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